Southern Railway (U.S.)

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Southern Railway (U.S.)

The Southern Railway (reporting mark SOU) was a US class 1 railroad. It was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined beginning in the 1830s, formally becoming the Southern Railway in 1894. It was placed under control of the Norfolk Southern Corporation, along with the Norfolk and Western Railway (N&W), in 1982, and was renamed Norfolk Southern Railway in 1990. (The N&W continued to exist as a subsidiary until 1997.)

At the end of 1970 Southern operated 6026 miles of railroad, not including its Class I subsidiaries AGS (528 miles) CofG (1729 miles) S&A (167 miles) CNOTP (415 miles) GS&F (454 miles) and twelve Class II subsidiaries. That year Southern itself reported 26111 million net ton-miles of revenue freight and 110 million passenger-miles; AGS reported 3854 and 11, CofG 3595 and 17, S&A 140 and 0, CNOTP 4906 and 0.3, and GS&F 1431 and 0.

Read more about Southern Railway (U.S.):  History, Notable Features, Passenger Trains, Merger Into Norfolk Southern, Roads Owned By The Southern Railway, Major Railroad Yards, Company Officers, Heritage Unit

Famous quotes containing the words railway and/or southern:

    Her personality had an architectonic quality; I think of her when I see some of the great London railway termini, especially St. Pancras, with its soot and turrets, and she overshadowed her own daughters, whom she did not understand—my mother, who liked things to be nice; my dotty aunt. But my mother had not the strength to put even some physical distance between them, let alone keep the old monster at emotional arm’s length.
    Angela Carter (1940–1992)

    My course is a firm assertion and maintenance of the rights of the colored people of the South according to the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments, coupled with a readiness to recognize all Southern people, without regard to past political conduct, who will now go with me heartily and in good faith in support of these principles.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)