South African Oil Embargo

The South African oil embargo was introduced on 20 November 1987 when the United Nations General Assembly adopted a voluntary international oil embargo against South Africa in order to put pressure on the government to end the racist policies of apartheid.

Other articles related to "south, south african":

October 1 - Births
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Famous quotes containing the words embargo, oil, south and/or african:

    It took six weeks of debate in the Senate to get the Arms Embargo Law repealed—and we face other delays during the present session because most of the Members of the Congress are thinking in terms of next Autumn’s election. However, that is one of the prices that we who live in democracies have to pay. It is, however, worth paying, if all of us can avoid the type of government under which the unfortunate population of Germany and Russia must exist.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    Mr. Chadband is a large yellow man, with a fat smile, and a general appearance of having a good deal of train oil in his system.
    Charles Dickens (1812–1870)

    ...I always said if I lived to get grown and had a chance, I was going to try to get something for my mother and I was going to do something for the black man of the South if it would cost my life; I was determined to see that things were changed.
    Fannie Lou Hamer (1917–1977)

    We live in a highly industrialized society and every member of the Black nation must be as academically and technologically developed as possible. To wage a revolution, we need competent teachers, doctors, nurses, electronics experts, chemists, biologists, physicists, political scientists, and so on and so forth. Black women sitting at home reading bedtime stories to their children are just not going to make it.
    Frances Beale, African American feminist and civil rights activist. The Black Woman, ch. 14 (1970)