Somali National Movement

The Somali National Movement (Somali: Dhaq dhaqaaqa wadaniga soomaliyeed, Arabic: الحركة الوطنية الصوماليه‎) was a 1980s–1990s Somali rebel group. Founded and led by Isaaq members to protect the clan's interests, it was key in the formation of Somaliland, a self-declared sovereign state that is internationally recognised as an autonomous region of Somalia.

Read more about Somali National Movement:  Formation, Insurgency in Somalia 1982–1988, Military Operations, Mid-1980s: Factions Vie For Control, Loss of Ethiopian Support, 1988: Renewed Fighting, 1988, Somali Civil War, Somaliland

Other articles related to "national, somali national movement, somalis":

German Unity Day - History of The National Holiday in Germany - Attempt To Change The Date of National Holiday
... Instead of October 3, the National Reunification should be celebrated on the first Sunday of October ... be seen as a provocation and devaluing the national holiday ... on 7 October, which happens to have been the national day of East Germany this date would thus have been seen as commemorating the division of Germany rather than the ...
Zdravljica
... changes in 1848, is a poem by the Slovene Romantic poet France Prešeren, considered the national poet of Slovenes ... On 27 September 1989, it became the national anthem of Slovenia ... of a united Slovenia, which the March Revolution in 1848 elevated into a national political programme ...
Orienteering - Governing Bodies - National
... These national bodies are the rule-making body for that nation ... For example the British Orienteering Federation is the national governing body for the United Kingdom ...
Mohamed Ibrahim Warsame 'Hadrawi' - Somali National Movement
... when he joined the opposition Somali National Movement based in Ethiopia ... be a very important poet commenting on the predicament the Somalis face ...

Famous quotes containing the words movement and/or national:

    What had really caused the women’s movement was the additional years of human life. At the turn of the century women’s life expectancy was forty-six; now it was nearly eighty. Our groping sense that we couldn’t live all those years in terms of motherhood alone was “the problem that had no name.” Realizing that it was not some freakish personal fault but our common problem as women had enabled us to take the first steps to change our lives.
    Betty Friedan (20th century)

    Thinking is the most unhealthy thing in the world, and people die of it just as they die of any other disease. Fortunately, in England at any rate, thought is not catching. Our splendid physique as a people is entirely due to our national stupidity.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)