Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm

Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm is a polemical essay written by Murray Bookchin and published as a book in 1995. It is a critique of deep ecology, bio-centrism and lifestyle anarchism. Bookchin sets his social anarchism in opposition to individualist, primitivist and post-modern forms of anarchism (represented, he maintains, by such anarchist philosophers as John Zerzan and Hakim Bey). It has provoked criticism from anarchist writers like Bob Black and John Clark, who view Bookchin's polemic as misguided.

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Social Anarchism Or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm - Publication History
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