Smallpox Survivors Society and Culture

Some articles on survivors:

Sullivan Brothers - History
... believed it would be reckless to look for survivors, thereby exposing his wounded ships to a still-lurking Japanese submarine ... US B-17 bomber on patrol to notify Allied headquarters to send aircraft or ships to search for survivors ... not to break radio silence, did not pass the message about searching for survivors to their headquarters until they had landed several hours later ...
1996 Mount Everest Disaster - South Col Route Events - May 11
... Making a difficult decision that they could not be saved by the hypoxic survivors at Camp IV nor evacuated in time, he left them for nature to take its ... after a storm had collapsed his tent overnight and the survivors once again thought he had died Krakauer discovered he was still conscious as the survivors in Camp IV prepared to ...
MV Princess Victoria - Rescue Attempt
... lifeboats, the merchant ships were unable to rescue the survivors in lifeboats as the fierce waves were in danger of dashing the smaller boats against the sides of the larger ships ... Samuel Kelly arrived and was able to bring survivors on board ... awarded the George Medal for diving into the water to help survivors ...
Pinkville - Aftermath - Survivors
... In early 1972, the camp (at Mỹ Lai 2) where the survivors of the Mỹ Lai Massacre had been relocated was largely destroyed by Army of the Republic ...

Famous quotes containing the words culture, society, smallpox and/or survivors:

    The problem of culture is seldom grasped correctly. The goal of a culture is not the greatest possible happiness of a people, nor is it the unhindered development of all their talents; instead, culture shows itself in the correct proportion of these developments. Its aim points beyond earthly happiness: the production of great works is the aim of culture.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    A society which is clamoring for choice, which is filled with many articulate groups, each urging its own brand of salvation, its own variety of economic philosophy, will give each new generation no peace until all have chosen or gone under, unable to bear the conditions of choice. The stress is in our civilization.
    Margaret Mead (1901–1978)

    The man who would change the name of Arkansas is the original, iron-jawed, brass-mouthed, copper-bellied corpse-maker from the wilds of the Ozarks! He is the man they call Sudden Death and General Desolation! Sired by a hurricane, dam’d by an earthquake, half-brother to the cholera, nearly related to the smallpox on his mother’s side!
    —Administration in the State of Arka, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    I believe that all the survivors are mad. One time or another their madness will explode. You cannot absorb that much madness and not be influenced by it. That is why the children of survivors are so tragic. I see them in school. They don’t know how to handle their parents. They see that their parents are traumatized: they scream and don’t react normally.
    Elie Wiesel (b. 1928)