Slovenian Tolar - Historical Exchange Rates

Historical Exchange Rates

Lower number indicates the tolar has a higher value.

  • SIT per EUR – 233.0 (April 2006); 239.5 (June 2005); 235.7 (November 2003); 227.3 (June 2002). From 1 January 2007 the rate was irrevocably set at 239.640 and has been finalised by the European Commission.
  • SIT per USD – 193.0 (April 2006); 198.0 (June 2005); 201.3 (November 2003); 195.06 (January 2000); 181.77 (1999); 166.13 (1998); 159.69 (1997); 135.36 (1996); 118.52 (1995).

Read more about this topic:  Slovenian Tolar

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