Silk Road Transmission of Buddhism - Buddhism in The Book of Later Han

Buddhism in The Book of Later Han

The (5th century) Book of the Later Han, compiled by Fan Ye (398-446 CE), documented early Chinese Buddhism. This history records that around 65 CE, Buddhism was practiced in the courts of both Emperor Ming of Han (r. 58-75 CE) at Luoyang (modern Henan) and, his half-brother, King Ying (r. 41-70 CE) of Chu at Pengcheng (modern Jiangsu).

The Book of Han has given rise to discussions on the maritime or overland transmission of Buddhism, and the origins of Buddhism in India or China.

Read more about this topic:  Silk Road Transmission Of Buddhism

Other articles related to "buddhism in the book of later han, han, in the book of later han, buddhism in":

Silk Road Transmission Of Buddhism - Buddhism in The Book of Later Han - The Book of Han - Origins of Buddhism
... Fan Ye's Commentary noted that neither of the Former Han histories – the (109-91 BCE) Records or the Grand Historian (which records Zhang Qian visiting Central Asia) and (111 ... In the Book of Later Han, "The Kingdom of Tianzhu" (天竺, Northwest India) section of "The Chronicle of the Western Regions" summarizes the origins of Buddhism in ... Central Vietnam) and presenting tribute to Emperor He of Han (r ...

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