Silesian Cuisine - List of Silesian Dishes

List of Silesian Dishes

  • Żymła - a well-baked bread roll, oval with a division in the middle, topped with poppy seeds, similar to Austrian Kaisersemmel.
  • Kluski śląskie (Silesian dumplings) - round shaped dumplings served with gravy, made of mashed boiled potatoes, finely grated raw potatoes, an egg, grated onion, wheat flour and potato flour.
  • Rolada z modrą kapustą (rouladen with red cabbage) - best-quality beef-meat roll; stuffed with pickled vegetable, ham, and good amount of seasoning; always served with red cabbage (with fried bacon, fresh onion and allspice); traditionally eaten with kluski śląskie for Sunday dinner.
  • Szałot (Silesian potato salad) - a salat made of squares of boiled potatoes, carrots, peas, ham, various sausages, pickled fish, boiled eggs, bonded with olive oil or mayonnaise.
  • Krupniok - kind of blood sausage made of kasha and animal blood.
  • Żymlok - like krupniok but instead kasha there is bread roll (żymła).
  • Wodzionka or brołtzupa (ger. brot - bread, pol. zupa - soup) - soup with garlic and squares of dried rye bread.
  • Siemieniotka - soup made of hemp seed, one of main Christmas Eve meals.
  • Knysza - pita bread with meat and lots of cabbage.
  • [Moczka) - traditional Christmas Eve dessert, its main ingredients are: gingerbread extract, nuts and dried fruit, strawberry compote and almonds.
  • "Makowki" - traditional Christmas Eve dessert,many elaborate recipes possible; based on finely ground poppy seeds, with raisins, almonds, candied citrus peels, honey, sugar, pudding, and flavoured with rum. Decorated with fingers of crumbling.
  • Hauskyjza - strongly-flavored, home-made cheese with carawey seeds
  • Kopalnioki - hard candies (sil. bombony) made of sugar, anise oil, and the essences of St John's wort, melissa, peppermint. Its black colour comes from charcoal food dye.

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