Shripad Mahadev Mate - Family

Family

Mate's son Madhukar (b. 1930) was a professor of Proto and Ancient Indian History at Deccan College's Postgraduate and Research Department, and wrote the book Archaeology of Medieval India.

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Famous quotes containing the word family:

    The law is equal before all of us; but we are not all equal before the law. Virtually there is one law for the rich and another for the poor, one law for the cunning and another for the simple, one law for the forceful and another for the feeble, one law for the ignorant and another for the learned, one law for the brave and another for the timid, and within family limits one law for the parent and no law at all for the child.
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