Secretary of State For India

The Secretary of State for India, or India Secretary, was the British Cabinet minister responsible for the government of India, Burma and Aden, and the political head of the India Office. The post was created in 1858 when the East India Company's rule in India ended and British India was brought under the direct administration of the government in London, beginning a period often called the British Raj.

In 1937, in consequence of the Government of India Act 1935, which among other things separated Burma and Aden from India, a new Burma Office was created, but the same Secretary of State headed both Departments and was styled the Secretary of State for India and Burma. The India Office and its Secretary of State were abolished in 1947, when the Partition of India resulted in the creation of two new independent dominions, the Union of India and the Dominion of Pakistan. Burma achieved independence separately early in 1948.

Read more about Secretary Of State For India:  Secretaries of State For India, 1858-1937, Secretaries of State For India and Burma, 1937-1947, Secretaries of State For Burma, 1947-1948

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    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)

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