Secondary Active Transport - Secondary Active Transport

Secondary Active Transport

In secondary active transport, also known as coupled transport or co-transport, energy is used to transport molecules across a membrane; however, in contrast to primary active transport, there is no direct coupling of ATP; instead, the electrochemical potential difference created by pumping ions out of the cell is used. Permitting one ion or molecule to move from the side where it is more concentrated to that where it is less concentrated increases entropy and can serve as a source of energy for metabolism (e.g. in ATP synthase).

In August 1960, in Prague, Robert K. Crane presented for the first time his discovery of the sodium-glucose cotransport as the mechanism for intestinal glucose absorption. Crane's discovery of cotransport was the first ever proposal of flux coupling in biology.

Cotransporters can be classified as symporters and antiporters depending on whether the substances move in the same or opposite directions.

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Other articles related to "secondary active transport, transports":

Primary Active Transport - Secondary Active Transport - Symport
... An example is the glucose symporter SGLT1, which co-transports one glucose (or galactose) molecule into the cell for every two sodium ions it imports into the cell ...

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