Secondary Active Transport

Secondary Active Transport

Active transport is the movement of all types of molecules across a cell membrane against its concentration gradient (from low to high concentration). In all cells, this is usually concerned with accumulating high concentrations of molecules that the cell needs, such as ions, glucose and amino acids. If the process uses chemical energy, such as from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), it is termed primary active transport. Secondary active transport involves the use of an electrochemical gradient. Active transport uses cellular energy, unlike passive transport, which does not use cellular energy. Active transport is a good example of a process for which cells require energy. Examples of active transport include the uptake of glucose in the intestines in humans and the uptake of mineral ions into root hair cells of plants.

Read more about Secondary Active Transport:  Details, Primary Active Transport, ATP Using Primary Active Transport Types, Secondary Active Transport, Examples, Endocytosis, See Also

Other articles related to "secondary active transport, transports":

Primary Active Transport - Secondary Active Transport - Symport
... An example is the glucose symporter SGLT1, which co-transports one glucose (or galactose) molecule into the cell for every two sodium ions it imports into the cell ...

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