Seawall

A seawall (also written as sea wall) is a form of coastal defense constructed where the sea, and associated coastal processes, impact directly upon the landforms of the coast. The purpose of a seawall is to protect areas of human habitation, conservation and leisure activities from the action of tides and waves. As a seawall is a static feature it will conflict with the dynamic nature of the coast and impede the exchange of sediment between land and sea.

The coast is generally a high-energy, dynamic environment with spatial variations occurring over a wide range of temporal scales. The shoreline is part of the coastal interface which is exposed to a wide range of erosional processes arising from fluvial, aoelian and terrestrial sources, meaning that a combination of denudational processes will work against a seawall. Given the natural forces to which seawalls are constantly subjected, maintenance (and eventually replacement) is an ongoing requirement if they are to provide an effective long term solution.

The many types of seawall in use today reflect both the varying physical forces they are designed to withstand, and location specific aspects, such as: local climate, coastal position, wave regime, and value of landform. Seawalls are classified as a hard engineering shore based structure used to provide protection and to lessen coastal erosion. However, a range of environmental problems and issues may arise from the construction of a seawall, including disrupting sediment movement and transport patterns, which are discussed in more detail below. Combined with a high construction cost, this has led to an increasing use of other soft engineering coastal management options such as beach replenishment.

Seawalls may be constructed from a variety of materials, most commonly: reinforced concrete, boulders, steel, or gabions. Additional seawall construction materials may include: vinyl, wood, aluminium, fibreglass composite, and with large biodegrable sandbags made of jute and coir. In the UK, sea wall also refers to an earthen bank used to create a polder, or a dike.

Read more about Seawall:  Design Principles and Types, History, Advanced Numerical Study, Efficacy and Trade-offs

Other articles related to "seawall, seawalls":

Seawalls - See Also
... Constantinople Sea Walls Breakwater Retaining wall Accropode Dike Alaskan Way Seawall Galveston Seawall Georgetown Seawall Gold Coast Seawall Saemangeum ...
Seawall - Efficacy and Trade-offs
... conclusion, a cost benefit approach is an effective way to determine whether a seawall is appropriate and if the benefits are worth the expense ... It is important to remember that a seawall is a static feature, it will conflict with the dynamic nature of the coast and impede the exchange of sediment ... Table 2 summarises the overall positive and negative effects of seawalls which is useful when comparing their effectiveness to other coastal management options such as ...
Wheelers Bay
... Today's shoreline is a concrete seawall, constructed in the early 1990s at a cost of £1.6 million, to protect the cliff from erosion ... bay is accessed by a concrete slope from the road above the bay or by walking along the seawall either from Ventnor or Horseshoe Bay ... Coastal Path runs the length of the bay along this seawall ...
Seawalls - Historical Examples - Vancouver
... The Vancouver Seawall is a stone seawall constructed around the perimeter of Stanley Park in Vancouver ... The seawall was constructed initially as waves created by ships passing through the First Narrows were eroding the area between Prospect Point and Brockton Point ... The Vancouver Seawall also exemplifies how seawalls can be utilised and valued for recreational activities and coastal sightseeing ...
Seawalls
... A seawall (also written as sea wall) is a form of coastal defense constructed where the sea, and associated coastal processes, impact directly upon ... The purpose of a seawall is to protect areas of human habitation, conservation and leisure activities from the action of tides and waves ... As a seawall is a static feature it will conflict with the dynamic nature of the coast and impede the exchange of sediment between land and sea ...