Sea of Japan

The Sea of Japan is a marginal sea of the western Pacific Ocean, between the Asian mainland, the Japanese archipelago and Sakhalin. It is bordered by Japan, North Korea, Russia and South Korea. Like the Mediterranean Sea, it has almost no tides due to its nearly complete enclosure from the Pacific Ocean. This isolation also reflects in the fauna species and in the water salinity, which is lower than in the ocean. The sea has no large islands, bays or capes. Its water balance is mostly determined by the inflow and outflow through the straits connecting it to the neighboring seas and Pacific Ocean. Few rivers discharge into the sea and their total contribution to the water exchange is within 1%.

The seawater is characterized by the elevated concentration of dissolved oxygen that results in high biological productivity. Therefore, fishing is the dominant economic activity in the region. The intensity of shipments across the sea has been moderate owing to political issues, but it is steadily increasing as a result of the growth of East Asian economies. A controversy exists about the sea name, with South Korea promoting the appellation East Sea.

Read more about Sea Of Japan:  Extent, Geography and Geology, Climate, Hydrology, Flora and Fauna, Economy, History and Exploration, Naming Dispute

Other articles related to "sea of japan, sea, sea of, japan":

Sea Of Japan - Naming Dispute
... The use of the term "Sea of Japan" as the dominant name is a point of contention ... South Korea wants the name "East Sea" to be used, either instead of or in addition to "Sea of Japan" while North Korea prefers the name "East Sea of Korea" ... Japan claims the term has been the international standard since at least the early 19th century, while the Koreas claim that the term "Sea of Japan" arose ...

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