Script and Scribble: The Rise and Fall of Handwriting

Script and Scribble: The Rise and Fall of Handwriting is a book by author Kitty Burns Florey that discusses the history of penmanship and confronts the present tension between handwriting and electronic communication. Melville House Publishing published the book in January 2009.

Famous quotes containing the words script and, handwriting, fall, script and/or rise:

    ...he sent letters to all the royal provinces, to every province in its own script and to every people in its own language, declaring that every man should be master in his own house.
    Bible: Hebrew, Esther 1:22.

    King Ahasuerus, after his Queen Vashti refused to come at the king’s command.

    Poets don’t draw. They unravel their handwriting and then tie it up again, but differently.
    Jean Cocteau (1889–1963)

    If the heart beguiles itself in its choice [of a wife], and imagination will give excellencies which are not the portion of flesh and blood:Mwhen the dream is over, and we awake in the morning, it matters little whether ‘tis Rachael or Leah,—be the object what it will, as it must be on the earthly side ... of perfection,—it will fall short of the work of fancy, whose existence is in the clouds.
    Laurence Sterne (1713–1768)

    Take what the old-church
    found in Mithra’s tomb,
    candle and script and bell,
    take what the new-church spat upon
    and broke and shattered.
    Hilda Doolittle (1886–1961)

    Considered physiologically, everything ugly weakens and saddens man. It reminds him of decay, danger, impotence; it actually reduces his strength. The effect of ugliness can be measured with a dynamometer. Whenever anyone feels depressed, he senses the proximity of something “ugly.” His feeling of power, his will to power, his courage, his pride—they decline with ugliness, they rise with beauty.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)