Schijt - Profanity Related To Illness and Disability

Profanity Related To Illness and Disability

achterlijk Achterlijk (literally: "retarded") is an offensive term for the mentally handicapped. A humorous variation, "achterlijke gladiool" (literally: "retarded gladiolus"), was first lexicalized in 1984.
debiel Debiel is an offensive term for the mentally handicapped. It is commonly used as an insult.
idioot Idioot means "idiot".
kanker Kanker means "cancer". It can be used as a strong expletive, as an adjective or as an adverb. Krijg de kanker ("get the cancer") is used as an insult. In slang, it can also have a positive meaning. For example, kankerlekker can mean "extremely good tasting". Although it is meant positively, it is still frowned upon. Kanker can be paired with nearly any insult to intensify it. The word is sometimes shortened to its historical euphemism K.
kankeren Kankeren (literally: "to cancer") is a verb, and means "to complain excessively".
kankerlijer Kankerlijer means "cancer sufferer". It is a strong insult: an example of its legal status can be found in a 2008 court case, in which using the word kankerlijer to insult a police officer was cited as a serious offense.
klere Klere is a slang word for cholera. It can be used as an expletive, as an adjective or as an adverb. Kolere is a common variation.
klerelijer Klerelijer is a slang word meaning "cholera sufferer". It is used an as insult, and roughly analogous to "asshole".
kolere Kolere is a slang word for cholera. It can be used as an expletive, as an adjective or as an adverb. Klere is a common variation.
krijg de... To wish a disease upon someone, the words krijg de... ("catch the...", "get the...", "contract the...") are typically used. Examples include krijg de tering, krijg de tyfus, krijg de kanker, krijg de pest, krijg de takke, krijg de klere, krijg het lazarus and the more euphemistic (but more old-fashioned) krijg de ziekte. In standard Dutch, the article is superfluous or incorrect in these phrases, and consequently "de" and "het" are only paired with disease names in context of profanity.
lazarus Lazarus is a euphemism for leprosy. Krijg het lazarus ("catch the leprosy") is uncommonly used as an insult. More common is the expression "zich het lazarus zuipen" ("to excessively drink oneself leprosy"). Consequently, the expression "he or she is lazarus" has come to mean "he or she is drunk".
mongool Mongool ("mongoloid") is a common insult, referring to Down syndrome. Its diminutive mongooltje is often used as a somewhat more neutral or affectionate term for people with Down syndrome, although it is not considered politically correct. Kankermongool ("cancer-mongoloid") is a common variation: see kanker.
lijer Lijer (literally: "sufferer") is a noun and suffix. It is correctly spelled "lijder", but the "d" becomes silent in slang. It is used both as a standalone insult and in combination with diseases, such as kankerlijer, pleurislijer, pokke(n)lijer, takkelijer, teringlijer and tyfuslijer.
pest Pest (literally: "plague", compare "pestilence") can be used as an adjective or as an adverb. The verb pesten means "to bully" (whereas the etymologically related "plagen" means "to tease"). "De pest in hebben" ("to have the plague in") means "to be irritated". The word is sometimes shortened to its historical euphemism P.
pestkop Literally meaning "plague head", a pestkop is someone who engages in bullying. See pest and kop.
pleur(it)is Pleuris, or less commonly pleuritis, is a slang word for tuberculosis (compare tering), originally referring to any form of lung infection. It can be used as an expletive, as an adjective or as an adverb. Krijg de pleuris ("catch the tuberculosis") is also commonly used. As with tering, the phrase "alles ging naar de pleuris" ("everything went to the tuberculosis", analogous to "everything went to hell") is commonly used. As a verb, the word oppleuren (literally "to tuberculosis off") can mean "to fuck off" (compare optiefen under tyfus).
pleurislijer Pleurislijer is a slang word meaning "tuberculosis sufferer". It is used an as insult, and roughly analogous to "asshole".
polio Polio is uncommon as a curse word, and is mostly heard in the phrase "heb je soms polio?" ("do you have polio or something?"), which can be used to insult someone's perceived laziness. The Genootschap Onze Taal (Dutch Language Society) has recently noted a rise in the use of polio as an expletive and adjective in the Rotterdam area, and describes it as a possible alternative to the more severe kanker.
pokke(n) Pokke(n) (correctly spelled "pokken") is a slang word for smallpox. It can be used as an adjective or as an adverb.
pokke(n)lijer Pokke(n)lijer is a slang word meaning "smallpox sufferer". It is used an as insult, and roughly analogous to "asshole".
stom Stom (literally: "unintelligent", "dumb", "mute") can be used an intensifier when using curse words. Examples are "stomme hoer" ("dumb whore") and "stomme kut" ("dumb cunt").
takke Takke (from the French "attaque") is a slang word for stroke. It can be used an adjective or as an adverb. Krijg de takke ("have the stroke") is used as an insult. A common variation is takkewijf ("stroke woman"): see also wijf.
tering Tering is a slang word for tuberculosis. It is short voor "vertering" (literally: "digestion"; compare English "consumption"). It can be used as an expletive, as an adjective or as an adverb. Vliegende tering ("flying tuberculosis") is a humorous variation, originally referring to sudden-onset tuberculosis. Krijg de tering ("catch the tuberculosis") is used as an insult. Other words for tuberculosis include TB and TBC, which were historically used as euphemisms, owing to the fact that names of diseases were considered profane. As with pleuris, the phrase "alles ging naar de tering" ("everything went to the tuberculosis", analogous to "everything went to hell") is commonly used.
teringlijer Teringlijer is a slang word meaning "tuberculosis sufferer". It is used an as insult, and roughly analogous to "asshole".
tyfus Tyfus is a word for typhoid fever. It can be used as an expletive, as an adjective or as an adverb. Krijg de tyfus ("catch the typhoid fever") is used as an insult. The variation optiefen ("to typhoid off") is analogous to "fuck off" (compare oppleuren under pleuris). Sanders and Tempelaars (1998) note tiefttering ("typhoid tuberculosis") as a variation common in Rotterdam.
tyfuslijer Tyfuslijer is a slang word meaning "typhoid fever sufferer". It is used an as insult, and roughly analogous to "asshole".
vinkentering Vinkentering (literally: "finch tuberculosis") is noted by Sanders and Tempelaars (1998) as an expression that is typical in the Rotterdam vocabulary. A noted humorous variation is krijg de (vliegende) vinkentering ("catch the (flying) finch tuberculosis"). See also tering.
ziekte Ziekte (literally: "sickness", "illness" or "disease") is used in the expression krijg de ziekte ("catch the disease"). It is a euphemism that can be used for various afflictions. Older variations include "drinken als de ziekte" ("drinking like the disease") and "lui als de ziekte" ("as lazy as the disease").

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