Scene - Science and Technology

Science and Technology

  • Scene (perception), a set of information that can flow from a physical environment into a perceptual system via sensory transduction
  • Warez scene, a subculture of people who make copies of software, music and movies and/or distributes them, also known as The Scene
  • Demoscene, a computer subculture
  • Computer art scene or Artscene, a group of people creating computer-based art
  • scene file in computer graphic

Read more about this topic:  Scene

Other articles related to "science, science and, science and technology, technology":

J. Robert Oppenheimer - Final Years
... eventually become the World Academy of Art and Science in 1960 ... he attend the first Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs in 1957 ... in a world in which the freedom of science to exchange ideas was more and more hobbled by political concerns ...
Science and Society - Political Usage
... See also Politicization of science Many issues damage the relationship of science to the media and the use of science and scientific arguments by politicians ... where an organization or think tank makes it their only goal to cast doubt on supported science because it conflicts with political agendas ...
List Of University Of California, Los Angeles People - Notable Alumni - Academia, Science and Technology
... in library and information science Charles Elachi, M.S. 1955 – physicist former president, California Institute of Technology Anna Lee Fisher, B.S ... Advisory to the Food and Drug Administration, National Science Foundation, the National Research Foundation, and the Ford Foundation David Ho – physician and AIDS researcher ...

Famous quotes containing the words science and, technology and/or science:

    Science is feasible when the variables are few and can be enumerated; when their combinations are distinct and clear. We are tending toward the condition of science and aspiring to do it. The artist works out his own formulas; the interest of science lies in the art of making science.
    Paul Valéry (1871–1945)

    The real accomplishment of modern science and technology consists in taking ordinary men, informing them narrowly and deeply and then, through appropriate organization, arranging to have their knowledge combined with that of other specialized but equally ordinary men. This dispenses with the need for genius. The resulting performance, though less inspiring, is far more predictable.
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908)

    “What we know, is a point to what we do not know.” Open any recent journal of science, and weigh the problems suggested concerning Light, Heat, Electricity, Magnetism, Physiology, Geology, and judge whether the interest of natural science is likely to be soon exhausted.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)