Scabbards

Some articles on scabbards, scabbard:

Panabas - Appearance - Scabbard
... Panabas scabbards were made of plain wood and are now extremely rare - according to accounts, largely because warriors would frequently discard them prior ... Such scabbards invariably consist of two pieces of wood which are taken apart to remove the sword, as opposed to the sheath-type scabbards used by most other swords ...
Modern Scabbards
... Entirely metal scabbards became popular in Europe early in the 19th century and eventually superseded most other types ... Nevertheless, leather scabbards never entirely lost favor among military users and were widely used as late as the American Civil War (1861-65) ... naval shore patrols, law enforcement and other groups used leather scabbards as a kind of truncheon ...
Sword Scabbards and Suspension
... Common accessories to the sword include the scabbard, as well as the sword belt ... Scabbard The scabbard, also known as the Sheath, is a protective cover often provided for the sword blade ... Over the millennia, scabbards have been made of many materials, including leather, wood, and metals such as brass or steel ...
Barong (knife) - Description - Scabbard
... Older barong scabbards tended only to be partially wrapped with large rattan lashings, while newer barong scabbards feature a full wrap of thin rattan ... Also, the scabbards of older barong featured thinner flat boards, whereas post World War II barong scabbards are of much thicker stock, and feature a central ... The terminus on modern-made scabbards tends to turn upward to a more dramatic degree, often at a near 90-degree angle and feature squared tips ...
M1905 Bayonet - Scabbards
... The original M1905 scabbard had a wooden body with a rawhide cover and used a wire belt hanger which went over and around the supporting belt ... The M1910 scabbard had a canvas covering with a leather tip ... The M1910 scabbard was the primary scabbard used during the first world war ...

Famous quotes containing the word scabbards:

    Yet, rather, are we scabbards to our souls. And the drawn sword of genius is more glittering than the drawn cimeter of Saladin.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)