Satyr Play

Satyr Play

Satyr plays were an ancient Greek form of tragicomedy, similar in spirit to burlesque. They featured choruses of satyrs, were based on Greek mythology, and were rife with mock drunkenness, brazen sexuality (including phallic props), pranks, sight gags, and general merriment.

Satyric drama was one of the three varieties of Athenian drama, the other two being tragedy and comedy. It can be traced back to Pratinas of Phlius, circa 500 BC. After settling in Athens, he probably adapted the dithyramb, customary in his native home, with its chorus of satyrs, to complement the form of tragedy which had been recently invented in Athens. It met with approval and was further developed by his son Aristeas, by Choerilus, by Aeschylus, and others.

In the Athenian Dionysia, each playwright customarily entered four plays into the competition: three tragedies and one satyr play to be performed either at the end of the festival or between the second and third tragedies of a trilogy, as a spirited entertainment, a comic relief to break the oppression of hours of gloomy, fatalistic, formulaic tragedy. They were short, half the duration of a tragedy. The general theme of heaven, fate, and the gods affecting human affairs in the tragedies was carried through into the festivities of the chorus of satyrs and Sileni, companions of Dionysus.

Read more about Satyr Play:  Origins, Structure and Content, Costumes

Other articles related to "satyr play, plays, play, satyr, satyrs":

History Of Theatre - Western Tradition - Greek Theatre
... Classical Athenian drama Tragedy Comedy Satyr play Aeschylus Sophocles Euripides Aristophanes Menander Poetics (335 BCE) The Birth of Tragedy (1872) Greek theatre, most ... of ancient Greece consisted of three types of drama tragedy, comedy, and the satyr play ... were required to present a tetralogy of plays (though the individual works were not necessarily connected by story or theme), which usually consisted of three tragedies and one satyr play ...
Theater - History - Classical and Hellenistic Greece
... theatre of ancient Greece consisted of three types of drama tragedy, comedy, and the satyr play ... characters they represented, and each might play several parts ... to stage drama) playwrights were required to present a tetralogy of plays (though the individual works were not necessarily connected by story or theme), which usually ...
Euripides - Work
... for accomplished actors to sing and this tendency becomes more marked in his later plays tragedy was a "living and ever-changing genre" (other changes in his work are ... Speakers in the plays of Aeschylus and Sophocles sometimes distinguished between slaves who are servile by nature and those who are slaves by mere circumstance but ... ex machina, as they do in eight of the extant plays, they appear "lifeless and mechanical" ...
Satyr
... In Greek mythology, a satyr ( /ˈsætər/, /ˈseɪtər/, Greek σάτυρος saturos) is one of a troop of male companions of Pan and Dionysus ... Roman Mythology identifies the Greek satyr with its faun being half-man, half-goat ... The satyrs' chief was Silenus, a minor deity associated (like Hermes and Priapus) with fertility ...
Satyr Play - Costumes
... On that vase, the satyrs are portrayed as half men and half goats, wearing goat’s horns on their heads, thus referring to the goat deities of the Doric type ... The goatish element has disappeared and the satyrs resemble the old Ionic Sileni who were horse deities ... Haigh claims that the Doric satyrs were the original performers in Attic tragedy and satiric drama, whereas the Ionic element was introduced at a later stage ...

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