Sarin Gas Attack On The Tokyo Subway

Sarin Gas Attack On The Tokyo Subway

The Sarin attack on the Tokyo subway, usually referred to in the Japanese media as the Subway Sarin Incident (地下鉄サリン事件, Chikatetsu Sarin Jiken?), was an act of domestic terrorism perpetrated by members of Aum Shinrikyo on March 20, 1995.

In five coordinated attacks, the perpetrators released sarin on several lines of the Tokyo Metro, killing thirteen people, severely injuring fifty and causing temporary vision problems for nearly a thousand others. The attack was directed against trains passing through Kasumigaseki and Nagatachō, home to the Japanese government. It is the most serious attack to occur in Japan since the end of World War II.

Read more about Sarin Gas Attack On The Tokyo SubwayBackground, Main Perpetrators, Attack, Aftermath, Aum/Aleph Today

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Sarin Gas Attack On The Tokyo Subway - Aum/Aleph Today
... The sarin attack was the most serious terrorist attack in Japan's modern history ... Shortly after the attack, Aum lost its status as a religious organization, and many of its assets were seized ... The Tokyo High Court postponed its decision on the appeal until results were obtained from a court-ordered psychiatric evaluation, which was issued to determine whether ...

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