Sarcophagi

Some articles on sarcophagi:

Ancient Roman Empire - The Arts - Sculpture - Sarcophagi
... Main article Ancient Roman sarcophagi Elaborately carved marble and limestone sarcophagi are characteristic of the 2nd to the 4th centuries with at least 10,000 ... The same workshops produced sarcophagi with Jewish or Christian imagery ...
Ulu Cami (Adana) - Türbe of Ramadanids
... of Ramadanids, with its tall rims and tall dome giving grandeur to it, hosts sarcophagi of Halil Bey and the sons of Piri Paşa, Mehmet Bey and Mustafa Bey ... The sarcophagi are covered with 16th century tilings ... On the front side of the sarcophagi there are inscriptions on the tilings ...
Ancient Roman Sarcophagi
... of ancient Rome, elaborately carved marble and limestone sarcophagi were characteristic of elite inhumation from the 2nd to the 4th centuries AD ... At least 10,000 Roman sarcophagi survive, with fragments possibly representing as many as 20,000 ... The same workshops produced sarcophagi with Jewish or Christian imagery ...
Funerary Art - History - Ancient Rome
... the 2nd century CE, inhumation (burial of unburnt remains) in sarcophagi, often elaborately carved, became more fashionable for those who could afford it ... In Italy, sarcophagi were mostly intended to be set against the wall of the tomb, and only decorated on three sides, in contrast to the free-standing styles of ... The relief scenes of Hellenistic art became even more densely crowded in later Roman sarcophagi, as for example in the 2nd century Portonaccio ...
Tomb Of The Scipios - Sarcophagi and Inscriptions
... There are two types of sarcophagi - "monolithic" (i.e ... The other sarcophagi of both types were added later as further shafts and rooms were sunk for the purpose ... The most important sarcophagi are those of Scipio Barbatus, now at the Vatican Museums, and that considered to belong to Ennius, both of substantial bulk ...

Famous quotes containing the word sarcophagi:

    The ancients adorned their sarcophagi with the emblems of life and procreation, and even with obscene symbols; in the religions of antiquity the sacred and the obscene often lay very close together. These men knew how to pay homage to death. For death is worthy of homage as the cradle of life, as the womb of palingenesis.
    Thomas Mann (1875–1955)