Sarah Fielding

Sarah Fielding (8 November 1710 – 9 April 1768) was a British author and sister of the novelist Henry Fielding. She was the author of The Governess, or The Little Female Academy (1749), which was the first novel in English written especially for children (children's literature), and had earlier achieved success with her novel The Adventures of David Simple (1744).

Read more about Sarah Fielding:  Childhood, Writing Career, Final Years, List of Works

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Jane Collier - Personal Life
... studied law and educated his sisters, along with her childhood friend Sarah Fielding, in Greek and Latin language and literature his manner of education was ... dissolved, and Margaret became the governess to Henry Fielding's daughters and Jane with Samuel Richardson ... she could not offer a sufficient dowry, or possibly because, like Sarah Fielding, she hoped to establish an independent living through her writing ...

Famous quotes by sarah fielding:

    [S]haring in common, without any thought of separate property, had ever been their friendly practice, from their first connection.
    Sarah Fielding (1710–1768)

    But this fully answered John’s purpose toward Betty, for as she did not understand, she highly admired him; and he concluded by again repeating that learning was a fine thing for a man but ‘twas both useless and blameworthy for a woman either to write or read.
    Sarah Fielding (1710–1768)

    And if anyone should think I am tracing this matter too curiously, I, who have considered it in various shapes, can only answer with Hamlet ... ‘Not a jot’; it being no more than the natural result of examining and considering the subject.
    Sarah Fielding (1710–1768)

    ‘Miss C_____’s father,’ says Betty, ‘had much better have bred his daughter a housewife, and then, mayhap, she might have got her a husband, which with all her fine learning she has not yet been able to do. And no wonder, for what man would be plagued with a slattern?’
    Sarah Fielding (1710–1768)