Rout

A rout is a chaotic and disorderly retreat or withdrawal of troops from a battlefield, resulting in the victory of the opposing party, or following defeat, a collapse of discipline, or poor morale. A routed army often degenerates into a sense of "every man for himself" as the surviving combatants attempt to flee to safety. A disorganized rout often results in much higher casualties for the retreating force than an orderly withdrawal. On many occasions, more soldiers are killed in the rout than in the actual battle. Normally, though not always, routs either effectively end a battle, or provide the decisive victory the winner needs to gain the momentum with which to end a battle (or even campaign) in their favor. The opposite of a rout is a rally, in which a military unit that has been giving way and is on the verge of being routed suddenly gathers itself and turns back to the offensive.

Read more about RoutHistory, Tactics, Other Uses of The Term

Other articles related to "rout":

Rout - Other Uses of The Term
... A rout is also a synonym for an overwhelming defeat as well as a verb meaning "to put to disorderly retreat" or "to defeat utterly", and is often used in sports to describe a blowout ... In law, a rout is a disturbance of the public peace by three or more persons acting together in a manner that suggests an intention to riot, although they do not actually carry out ... Rout is personified as the eponymous deity in Homer's Iliad as the cowardly son of Ares ...

Famous quotes containing the word rout:

    The flies swarmed on the putrid vulva, then
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    Allen Tate (1899–1979)

    Hence from scenic bacchanal,
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    Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917)

    As to the rout that is made about people who are ruined by extravagance, it is no matter to the nation that some individuals suffer. When so much general productive exertion is the consequence of luxury, the nation does not care though there are debtors in gaol; nay, they would not care though their creditors were there too.
    Samuel Johnson (1709–1784)