Rome Convention For The Protection of Performers

Some articles on rome convention for the protection of performers, protection, convention:

Rome Convention For The Protection Of Performers, Producers Of Phonograms And Broadcasting Organisat
... The Rome Convention for the Protection of Performers, Producers of Phonograms and Broadcasting Organisations was accepted by members of BIRPI, the predecessor to the modern World Intellectual Property ... The agreement extended copyright protection for the first time from the author of a work to the creators and owners of particular, physical manifestations of ... Nations drew up the Convention in response to new technologies like tape recorders that made the reproduction of sounds and images easier and cheaper than ever before ...

Famous quotes containing the words performers, protection, rome and/or convention:

    The reason I’m in this business, I assume all performers are—it’s “Look at me, Ma!” It’s acceptance, you know—”Look at me, Ma, look at me, Ma, look at me, Ma.” And if your mother watches, you’ll show off till you’re exhausted; but if your mother goes, Ptshew!
    Lenny Bruce (1925–1966)

    Without infringing on the liberty we so much boast, might we not ask our professional Mayor to call upon the smokers, have them register their names in each ward, and then appoint certain thoroughfares in the city for their use, that those who feel no need of this envelopment of curling vapor, to insure protection may be relieved from a nuisance as disgusting to the olfactories as it is prejudicial to the lungs.
    Harriot K. Hunt (1805–1875)

    I laugh when I think that all of Rome made it a point not to pronounce Drusilla’s name. Because Rome was mistaken for all those years. Love is not enough for me, and I understood that then.... To love someone is to accept to grow old with her. An old Drusilla is far worse than a dead one.
    Albert Camus (1913–1960)

    By convention there is color, by convention sweetness, by
    convention bitterness, but in reality there are atoms and space.
    Democritus (c. 460–400 B.C.)