River Tyne

The River Tyne i/ˈtaɪn/ is a river in North East England. It is formed by the confluence of two rivers: the North Tyne and the South Tyne. These two rivers converge at Warden Rock near Hexham in Northumberland at a place dubbed 'The Meeting of the Waters'.

The North Tyne rises on the Scottish border, north of Kielder Water. It flows through Kielder Forest, and passes through the village of Bellingham before reaching Hexham.

The South Tyne rises on Alston Moor, Cumbria and flows through the towns of Haltwhistle and Haydon Bridge, in a valley often called the Tyne Gap. Hadrian's Wall lies to the north of the Tyne Gap. Coincidentally the source of the South Tyne is very close to the sources of the other two great rivers of the industrial north east namely the Tees and the Wear. The South Tyne Valley falls within the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) - the second largest of the 40 AONBs in England and Wales.

The combined Tyne flows from Hexham, the area where the river's now thriving barbel stocks were first introduced in the mid 1980s, through Corbridge in Northumberland. It enters the county of Tyne and Wear between Clara Vale (in the Borough of Gateshead on the south bank) and Tyne Riverside Country Park (in Newcastle upon Tyne on the north bank) and continues to divide Newcastle and Gateshead for 13 miles (21 km), in the course of which it is spanned by 10 bridges. To the east of Gateshead and Newcastle, the Tyne divides Hebburn and Jarrow on the south bank from Walker and Wallsend on the north bank. Jarrow and Wallsend are linked underneath the river by the Tyne Tunnel. Finally it flows between South Shields and Tynemouth into the North Sea. As it passes through the Tyneside conurbation, the river marks the historic border between County Durham (to the south) and Northumberland (to the north).

Read more about River TynePort of Tyne, Origins of Name, Conservation, Songs Featuring The Tyne

Other articles related to "river tyne, tyne, rivers, river":

River Tyne Police
... The River Tyne Police was a police force which patrolled the River Tyne in England ... From 30 November 1949 it also took over responsibility for policing on the property of the Tyne Improvement Commission from the disbanded Tyne Improvement Commission Docks and Piers Police ... Harbour Tees and Hartlepool Port Authority Rivers canals Manchester Ship Canal Marine Police Force (River Thames) River Clyde River Tyne Tyne Improvement Commission Service police Royal Air Force Police ...
Swing Bridge, River Tyne
... The Swing Bridge is a swing bridge over the River Tyne, England connecting Newcastle upon Tyne and Gateshead, and lies between the Tyne Bridge and the High Level Bridge ... It was first used for road traffic on 15 June 1876 and opened for river traffic on 17 July 1876 ... The Swing Bridge stands on the site of the Old Tyne Bridges of 1270 and 1781, and probably of the Roman Pons Aelius ...
Wylam - Transport
... Newcastle and Carlisle Railway, also known as the Tyne Valley Line ... in 1838, and links the city of Newcastle upon Tyne in Tyne and Wear with Carlisle in Cumbria ... The line follows the course of the River Tyne through Northumberland ...
River Tyne, Scotland - Environment - Fishing
... Fishing tips for River Tyne The East Lothian Angling Association controls 25 miles of the tyne and its feeder burns there are Brown trout and sea trout ...
Newcastle Upon Tyne - Geography
... North East of England, in the ceremonial county of Tyne and Wear and the historical and traditional county of Northumberland ... is located on the northern bank of the River Tyne at a latitude of 54.974° N and a longitude of 1.614° W ... Grey's Monument towards the valley of the River Tyne, was voted as England's finest street in 2005 in a survey of BBC Radio 4 listeners ...

Famous quotes containing the word river:

    There are books so alive that you’re always afraid that while you weren’t reading, the book has gone and changed, has shifted like a river; while you went on living, it went on living too, and like a river moved on and moved away. No one has stepped twice into the same river. But did anyone ever step twice into the same book?
    Marina Tsvetaeva (1892–1941)