Ribbon Creek Incident

The Ribbon Creek incident is the most common term for events which occurred on the night of April 8, 1956, when Staff Sergeant Matthew McKeon, a junior drill instructor at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, marched his assigned platoon into Ribbon Creek, a swampy tidal creek. The incident resulted in the deaths of six United States Marine Corps recruits. McKeon was found guilty of possession and use of alcoholic beverage.

Read more about Ribbon Creek IncidentThe Event, Investigation, Consequences, Public Opinion and Media Coverage

Other articles related to "ribbon creek incident, ribbon creek":

Matthew McKeon - Ribbon Creek Incident
2000 and 2045, he marched 74 men of Platoon 71 from their barracks to Ribbon Creek, one of the tidal streams on Parris Island, and led the men into the water ...
Ribbon Creek Incident - Public Opinion and Media Coverage
... The Ribbon Creek incident was the subject of significant media coverage ... Several publications, including Time Magazine reported thoroughly on the development of the trial ...

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    I teazed him with fanciful apprehensions of unhappiness. A moth having fluttered round the candle, and burnt itself, he laid hold of this little incident to admonish me; saying, with a sly look, and in a solemn but quiet tone, “That creature was its own tormentor, and I believe its name was BOSWELL.”
    James Boswell (1740–1795)

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    It might be seen by what tenure men held the earth. The smallest stream is mediterranean sea, a smaller ocean creek within the land, where men may steer by their farm bounds and cottage lights. For my own part, but for the geographers, I should hardly have known how large a portion of our globe is water, my life has chiefly passed within so deep a cove. Yet I have sometimes ventured as far as to the mouth of my Snug Harbor.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)