Rhymed Prose

Rhymed prose is a literary form and literary genre, written in unmetrical rhymes. This form has been known in many different cultures. In some cases the rhymed prose is a distinctive, well-defined style of writing. In modern literary traditions the boundaries of poetry are very broad (free verse, prose poetry, etc.), and some works may be described both as prose and poetry.

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Read more about Rhymed ProseArabic Culture and Influences, Chinese Culture, Indian Culture, European Cultures

Other articles related to "prose, rhymed prose, rhymed":

Rhythmical Office - Examples
... An example of an old metrical office, intermixed with Prose Responses, is that of St ... of rhythmical stanzas, and of stanzas formed by unequal lines in rhymed prose is shown in the old Office of Rictrudis, composed by Hucbald about 907 (A ... From the metrical offices, from the pure as well as from those mixed with rhymed prose, the transition was soon made to such as consisted of rhymed prose merely ...
Rhymed Prose - European Cultures
... Rhymed prose was a characteristic feature of the Divine Office until the end of the 12th century ... A type of the "rhymed office" were offices in rhymed prose, i.e ... and Germany, and a number of prominent composers of rhymed offices are known ...
Rhythmical Office - Terminology
... creating a text in poetic form in the place of a text in prose form, where the scheme existed, definitely arranged in all its parts ... the following characters (1) a metrical, of hexameters intermixed with prose or rhymed prose (2) a rhythmical, in the broadest sense, which will be explained below (3) a form embellished by strict rhythm ... (1) metrical offices, in hexameters or distichs (2) offices in rhymed prose, i ...

Famous quotes containing the words prose and/or rhymed:

    Poetry is the language in which man explores his own amazement ... says heaven and earth in one word ... speaks of himself and his predicament as though for the first time. It has the virtue of being able to say twice as much as prose in half the time, and the drawback, if you do not give it your full attention, of seeming to say half as much in twice the time.
    Christopher Fry (b. 1907)

    There is a Canon which confines
    A Rhymed Octosyllabic Curse
    If written in Iambic Verse
    To fifty lines.
    Hilaire Belloc (1870–1953)