Receptor Tyrosine

Some articles on receptor tyrosine, receptors, receptor, tyrosine:

Frizzled - Cysteine-rich Domain
... in diverse proteins, including several receptor tyrosine kinases ... of tissue-polarity genes encode proteins that appear to function as cell-surface receptors for Wnts ... The Frizzled genes belong to the seven transmembrane class of receptors (7TMR) and have in their extracellular region a cysteine-rich domain that has been implicated as the ...
AXL Receptor Tyrosine Kinase
... phosphatidylserine binding • transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine kinase activity • protein binding • ATP binding • protein ... The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase subfamily ... Although it is similar to other receptor tyrosine kinases, the Axl protein represents a unique structure of the extracellular region that juxtaposes IgL and FNIII repeats ...
Tyrosine-specific Protein Kinases - Receptor Tyrosine Kinases
... These kinases consist of a transmembrane receptor with a tyrosine kinase domain protruding into the cytoplasm ... More than 50 receptor tyrosine kinases are known in mammals ...
Leukocyte Receptor Tyrosine Kinase
... Leukocyte receptor tyrosine kinase is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the LTK gene ... The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the ALK/LTK receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) whose ligand is unknown ... Closely related to the insulin receptor family of RTKs ...
Tyrosine-specific Protein Kinases - Receptor-associated Tyrosine Kinases
... Tyrosine kinases recruited to a receptor following hormone binding are receptor-associated tyrosine kinases and are involved in a number of signaling cascades, in ... One such receptor-associated tyrosine kinase is Janus kinase (JAK), many of whose effects are mediated by STAT proteins ...

Famous quotes containing the word receptor:

    The disinterest [of my two great-aunts] in anything that had to do with high society was such that their sense of hearing ... put to rest its receptor organs and allowed them to suffer the true beginnings of atrophy.
    Marcel Proust (1871–1922)