Rating Scales For Depression - Scales Completed By Researchers

Scales Completed By Researchers

Some depression rating scales are completed by researchers. For example, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale includes 21 questions with between 3 and 5 possible responses which increase in severity. The clinician must choose the possible responses to each question by interviewing the patient and by observing the patient's symptoms. Designed by psychiatrist Max Hamilton in 1960, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale is one of the two most commonly used among those completed by researchers assessing the effects of drug therapy. Alternatively, the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale has ten items to be completed by researchers assessing the effects of drug therapy and is the other of the two most commonly used among such researchers. Other scale is the Raskin Depression Rating Scale; which rates the severity of the patients symptoms in three areas: verbal reports, behavior, and secondary symptoms of depression.

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