Raquette Lake

Some articles on lake, raquette lake, lakes:

Long Lake, New York - Communities and Locations in Long Lake - Geographic Features
... Beaver River – A river flowing out the west side of the town to Lake Lila ... Big Island – An island in Raquette Lake ... Bluff Point – A peninsula defining part of Outlet Bay in Raquette Lake ...
William West Durant
... In 1876, Durant built a rustic compound on Long Point in Raquette Lake in the center of the Adirondacks to entertain potential investors in the railroad and in his land development schemes ... William had first seen Raquette Lake the summer before, and spent the following winter living there in a tent ... William opened a stagecoach line from North Creek to Raquette Lake, dammed the Marion River to allow steamboat travel from Blue Mountain Lake through to Eagle and Utowana Lakes, and built steamboats ...
Adirondack Mountains - Human History
... up the Saint Lawrence and Rivière des Iroquois near what would become Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain in 1609, and thus may have been the first European to encounter the Adirondacks ... The British built Fort William Henry on the south end of Lake George in 1755 the French countered by building Fort Carillon on the north end, which was renamed Fort ... did not occur until after 1870 the headwaters of the Hudson River at Lake Tear of the Clouds near Mount Marcy were not discovered until more than fifty years after the discovery of the headwaters ...
Church Of The Good Shepherd (Raquette Lake, New York)
... The Church of the Good Shepherd is an Episcopal church on Saint Hubert's Isle in Raquette Lake, in the town of Long Lake, New York ... first Sunday of August at 300 pm, with free transportation from the Raquette Lake Village dock beginning at 200 pm ...
Raquette Lake, New York
... Raquette Lake is a hamlet in the Town of Long Lake in Hamilton County, New York, United States ... Raquette Lake is located on the west side of the lake, Raquette Lake ...

Famous quotes containing the word lake:

    A lake is the landscape’s most beautiful and expressive feature. It is earth’s eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature. The fluviatile trees next the shore are the slender eyelashes which fringe it, and the wooded hills and cliffs around are its overhanging brows.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)