Quantum Chromodynamics - Cross-relations To Solid State Physics

Cross-relations To Solid State Physics

There are unexpected cross-relations to solid state physics. For example, the notion of gauge invariance forms the basis of the well-known Mattis spin glasses, which are systems with the usual spin degrees of freedom for i =1,...,N, with the special fixed "random" couplings Here the εi and εk quantities can independently and "randomly" take the values ±1, which corresponds to a most-simple gauge transformation This means that thermodynamic expectation values of measurable quantities, e.g. of the energy are invariant.

However, here the coupling degrees of freedom, which in the QCD correspond to the gluons, are "frozen" to fixed values (quenching). In contrast, in the QCD they "fluctuate" (annealing), and through the large number of gauge degrees of freedom the entropy plays an important role (see below).

For positive J0 the thermodynamics of the Mattis spin glass corresponds in fact simply to a ferromagnet, just because these systems have no "frustration“ at all. This term is a basic measure in spin glass theory. Quantitatively it is identical with the loop-product along a closed loop W. However, for a Mattis spin glass - in contrast to "genuine" spin glasses - the quantity PW never becomes negative.

The basic notion "frustration" of the spin-glass is actually similar to the Wilson loop quantity of the QCD. The only difference is again that in the QCD one is dealing with SU(3) matrices, and that one is dealing with a "fluctuating" quantity. Energetically, perfect absence of frustration should be non-favorable and atypical for a spin glass, which means that one should add the loop-product to the Hamiltonian, by some kind of term representing a "punishment". - In the QCD the Wilson loop is essential for the Lagrangian rightaway.

The relation between the QCD and "disordered magnetic systems" (the spin glasses belong to them) were additionally stressed in a paper by Fradkin, Huberman und Shenker, which also stresses the notion of duality.

A further analogy consists in the already mentioned similarity to polymer physics, where, analogously to Wilson Loops, so-called "entangled nets" appear, which are important for the formation of the entropy-elasticity (force proportional to the length) of a rubber band. The non-abelian character of the SU(3) corresponds thereby to the non-trivial "chemical links“, which glue different loop segments together, and "asymptotic freedom" means in the polymer analogy simply the fact that in the short-wave limit, i.e. for (where Rc is a characteristic correlation-length for the glued loops, corresponding to the above-mentioned "bag radius", while λw is the wavelength of an excitation) any non-trivial correlation vanishes totally, as if the system had crystallized.

There is also a correspondence between confinement in QCD - the fact that the color-field is only different from zero in the interior of hadrons - and the behaviour of the usual magnetic field in the theory of type-II superconductors: there the magnetism is confined to the interiour of the Abrikosov flux-line lattice, i.e., the London penetration depth λ of that theory is analogous to the confinement radius Rc of quantum chromodynamics. Mathematically, this correspondendence is supported by the second term, on the r.h.s. of the Lagrangian.

Read more about this topic:  Quantum Chromodynamics

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