Psychogeography

Psychogeography, a subfield of geography, was defined in 1955 by Guy Debord as "the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organized or not, on the emotions and behavior of individuals." Another definition is "a whole toy box full of playful, inventive strategies for exploring cities...just about anything that takes pedestrians off their predictable paths and jolts them into a new awareness of the urban landscape."

Read more about Psychogeography:  Development, Dérive, Contemporary Psychogeography, Groups Involved in Psychogeography, Noted Psychogeographers

Other articles related to "psychogeography":

Situationist International - History - Origins (1945-1955)
... group collaboratively constructed the new field of psychogeography, which they defined as "the study of the specific effects of the geographical environment (whether consciously ...
Situationists - History - Origins (1945-1955)
... Individuals in the group collaboratively constructed the new field of psychogeography, which they defined as "the study of the specific effects of the geographical environment (whether ...
Situationists - Main Concepts - Psychogeography - Dérive
... By definition, psychogeography combines subjective and objective knowledge and studies ... Debord struggled to stipulate the finer points of this theoretical paradox, ultimately producing "Theory of the Dérive" in 1958, a document which essentially serves as an instruction manual for the psychogeographic procedure, executed through the act of dérive ("drift") ...
Psy-Geo-Conflux
... known as Conflux) is the annual New York City festival dedicated to psychogeography, where visual, performance and sound artists, writers, urban ... presentations a noise parade an art exhibition and a night of psychogeography-inspired live music, DJs, and video ... and alt-geographic exploration called psychogeography ...