Power To Win

Power To Win

The Port Adelaide Football Club is an Australian rules football club based in Alberton, South Australia, which plays in the Australian Football League (AFL) (in which they are known as the Power) and the South Australian National Football League (SANFL) (in which they are known as the Magpies). Port Adelaide is the older of the two clubs in South Australia playing in the AFL and the 18th Australian rules club formed in Australia. Since the club’s first game in 1870 it has won 36 SANFL premierships, including six in a row. The club also won the Champions of Australia competition on a record four occasions.

From its foundation in 1870 to 1996, the club representing Port Adelaide competed in the SANFL as the "Port Adelaide Football Club". The club has had various nicknames over the years, including: the Cockledivers, the Seaside Men, the Seasiders and the Magentas, before finally settling on the Magpies in 1902. In 1997, the club joined the Australian Football League. On entry, Port Adelaide adopted a new nickname, "The Power", and added two more colours (silver and teal). Since joining the AFL, Port Adelaide have added the 2004 AFL Grand Final to their premiership wins. Port Adelaide Magpies also hold 36 SANFL premierships, as well as the four Champion of Australia wins. The club's AFL licence is held by the SANFL.

Read more about Power To Win:  Club Creed, Current Playing List, Club Records

Other articles related to "power to win":

Power To Win - Club Records
... AFL – 8 wins (Rnd 8–15, 2002, Round 15–22, 2003). ...

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