Postmodern Art - Radical Movements in Modern Art

Radical Movements in Modern Art

In general, Pop Art and Minimalism began as modernist movements: a paradigm shift and philosophical split between formalism and anti-formalism in the early 1970s caused those movements to be viewed by some as precursors or transitional postmodern art. Other modern movements cited as influential to postmodern art are conceptual art and the use of techniques such as assemblage, montage, bricolage, and appropriation.

Read more about this topic:  Postmodern Art

Other articles related to "radical movements in modern art, modern art":

Late Modernism - Radical Movements in Modern Art - High and Low
... in 1990 Kirk Varnedoe and Adam Gopnik curated High and Low Modern Art and Popular Culture, at New York's Museum of Modern Art ...

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