Phylogenetics - History of Phylogenetics - Ernst Haeckel's Recapitulation Theory

Ernst Haeckel's Recapitulation Theory

During the late 19th century, Ernst Haeckel's recapitulation theory, or "biogenetic fundamental law", was widely accepted. It was often expressed as "ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny", i.e. the development of an organism successively mirrors the adult stages of successive ancestors of the species it belongs to. This theory has long been rejected. In fact, ontogeny evolves – the phylogenetic history of a species cannot be read directly from its ontogeny, as Haeckel thought would be possible, but characters from ontogeny can be (and have been) used as data for phylogenetic analyses; the more closely related two species are, the more apomorphies their embryos share.

Read more about this topic:  Phylogenetics, History of Phylogenetics

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