Pedestrian Safety Through Vehicle Design - Anatomy of A Pedestrian Crash

Anatomy of A Pedestrian Crash

Most pedestrian crashes involve a forward moving car (as opposed to buses and other vehicles with a vertical hood/bonnet). In such a crash, a standing or walking pedestrian is struck and accelerated to the speed of the car and then continues forward as the car brakes to a halt. Although the pedestrian is impacted twice, first by the car and then by the ground, most of the fatal injuries occur due to the interaction with the car. The vehicle designers usually focus their attention on understanding the car-pedestrian interaction, which is characterized by the following sequence of events: the vehicle bumper first contacts the lower limbs of the pedestrian, the leading edge of the hood hits the upper thigh or pelvis, and the head and upper torso are struck by the top surface of the hood and/or windshield.

Read more about this topic:  Pedestrian Safety Through Vehicle Design

Famous quotes containing the words crash, anatomy and/or pedestrian:

    The tree the tempest with a crash of wood
    Throws down in front of us is not to bar
    Our passage to our journey’s end for good,
    But just to ask us who we think we are....
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)

    Man is a shrewd inventor, and is ever taking the hint of a new machine from his own structure, adapting some secret of his own anatomy in iron, wood, and leather, to some required function in the work of the world.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    However global I strove to become in my thinking over the past twenty years, my sons kept me rooted to an utterly pedestrian view, intimately involved with the most inspiring and fractious passages in human development. However unconsciously by now, motherhood informs every thought I have, influencing everything I do. More than any other part of my life, being a mother taught me what it means to be human.
    Mary Kay Blakely (20th century)