Pavonia Ferry Railroad

Some articles on pavonia ferry railroad, railroad, ferry, ferry railroad:

Ferry, Alaska - Demographics
... There were 13 households out of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.2% were married couples living together, and 38.5% were non-families. 38.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older ...
List Of Streetcar Lines In Manhattan - List of Lines - North-south Lines
... Lines related to Broadway are listed first, and then the table contains all other lines by their Lower Manhattan trunk (if applicable) from east to west ... Company (post-1911) Name From To Major streets History New York Railways South Ferry and Vesey Street Line South Ferry City Hall Trinity Place became part of the Sixth Avenue Line and Eighth Avenue Line New York Railways Broadway Line South Ferry Central Park Broadway and Seventh Avenue opened by the Broadway and Seventh Avenue Railroad in 1864 leased by the Houston, West Street and Pavonia Ferry Railroad in 1893 leased by the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1893 leased by New York Railways in 1911 replaced by New York City Omnibus Corporation buses on February 12, 1936 (now the M5 bus) New York Railways Lexington Avenue Line Union Square, earlier South Ferry Harlem Broadway, 23rd Street, Lexington Avenue, 116th Street, and Lenox Avenue opened by the Lexington Avenue and Pavonia Ferry Railroad merged into the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1894 acquired by New York Railways in 1911 replaced by New York City Omnibus Corporation buses on March 25, 1936 (now the M102 bus) New York Railways Broadway and Columbus Avenue Line South Ferry Harlem Broadway, Seventh Avenue, 53rd Street, Columbus Avenue, 116th Street, and Lenox Avenue opened by the Columbus and Ninth Avenue Railroad leased by the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1893 and merged in 1895 acquired by New York Railways in 1911 replaced by New York City Omnibus Corporation buses on February 12, 1936 (now the M7 bus) New York Railways Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue Line Houston Street Manhattanville Broadway, Seventh Avenue, 53rd Street, Ninth Avenue, Broadway, and Amsterdam Avenue eliminated in 1919 New York Railways Broadway and University Place Line City Hall Central Park Church Street, Greene Street, Wooster Street, University Place, and Broadway replaced by the Broadway Line Third Avenue Railway Broadway Line East 34th Street Ferry Fort Lee Ferry 34th Street, First Avenue, 42nd Street, Broadway, and 125th Street December 15, 1946 (now the M104 bus) Third Avenue Railway Kingsbridge Line East Harlem Marble Hill 125th Street, Amsterdam Avenue, and Broadway June 22, 1947 (now the M100 bus) Third Avenue Railway Broadway and 145th Street Line Harlem Washington Heights 145th Street, Amsterdam Avenue, and Broadway June 29, 1947 Third Avenue Railway East Belt Line South Ferry 59th Street, earlier East Harlem South Street, Avenue D, 14th Street, and First Avenue opened by the Central Park, North and East River Railroad in 1863 leased to the Houston, West Street and Pavonia Ferry Railroad and Metropolitan Crosstown Railway in 1892 leased to the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1893 lease cancelled in 1908 bought by the Third Avenue Railway as part of the reorganized Belt Line Railway in 1913 Third Avenue Railway Avenue D Line City Hall East 23rd Street Ferry East Broadway, Columbia Street, Lewis Street, Avenue D, 14th Street, and Avenue A discontinued early, since it was largely redundant with the Avenue B Line and East Belt Line Third Avenue Railway Avenue B Line City Hall East 34th Street Ferry East Broadway, Avenue B, 14th Street, Avenue A, 24th Street, and First Avenue opened by the Dry Dock, East Broadway and Battery Railroad bought by the Third Avenue Railroad in 1897 leased by the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1900 lease cancelled in 1908 replaced by Avenue B and East Broadway Transit Company buses on July 30, 1932 (now the M9 bus) N/A Avenue A Line Williamsburg Bridge East 23rd Street Ferry Avenue A Second Avenue Railroad Astoria Line Astor Place East 92nd Street Ferry Second Avenue, 86th Street, and York Avenue Second Avenue Railroad First Avenue Line Astor Place East Harlem Second Avenue, 59th Street, and First Avenue Second Avenue Railroad Second Avenue Line Worth Street, earlier City Hall or Peck Slip East Harlem Worth Street, Bowery, and Second Avenue opened by the Second Avenue Railroad in 1853 leased by the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1898 lease cancelled in 1908 replaced by East Side Omnibus Corporation buses on June 25, 1933 (now the M15 bus) Third Avenue Railway Third Avenue Line City Hall Washington Heights Bowery, Third Avenue, 125th Street, and Amsterdam Avenue opened by the Third Avenue Railroad in 1853 leased by the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1900 lease cancelled in 1908 reorganized as the Third Avenue Railway in 1910 replaced by Surface Transportation Corporation buses on May 28, 1947 (now the M101 bus) New York Railways Fourth and Madison Avenues Line City Hall Harlem, earlier also East 34th Street Ferry Centre Street, Bowery, Park Avenue, and Madison Avenue opened by the New York and Harlem Railroad in 1832 leased by the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1896 leased by New York Railways in 1911 lease cancelled in 1920 but reinstated in 1932 replaced by Madison Avenue Coach Company buses on February 1, 1935 (now the M1 bus) N/A Fourth Avenue and Williamsburg Bridge Line Williamsburg, Brooklyn Grand Central Terminal Bowery and Park Avenue operated from 1904 to 1911 by the Metropolitan Street Railway New York Railways Sixth Avenue Line Greenwich Village, earlier South Ferry Central Park Trinity Place, West Broadway, and Sixth Avenue opened by the Sixth Avenue Railroad in 1852 leased by the Houston, West Street and Pavonia Ferry Railroad in 1892 leased by the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1893 leased by New York Railways in 1911 replaced by New York City Omnibus Corporation buses on March 12, 1936 (now the M6 bus) New York Railways Sixth Avenue Ferry Line Desbrosses Street Ferry Greenwich Village Watts Street, Varick Street, and Carmine Street discontinued September 21, 1919 New York Railways Sixth and Amsterdam Avenues Line South Ferry Manhattanville Trinity Place, West Broadway, Sixth Avenue, 53rd Street, Columbus Avenue, Broadway, and Amsterdam Avenue eliminated in 1919 New York Railways Lenox Avenue Line Central Park Harlem Lenox Avenue became part of the Broadway and Columbus Avenue Line and Broadway and Lexington Avenue Line New York Railways Seventh Avenue Line Greenwich Village, earlier Williamsburg, Brooklyn or City Hall Central Park Greenwich Avenue and Seventh Avenue opened by the Broadway and Seventh Avenue Railroad in 1864 leased by the Houston, West Street and Pavonia Ferry Railroad in 1893 leased by the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1893 leased by New York Railways in 1911 replaced by New York City Omnibus Corporation buses on March 6, 1936 (now the M10 bus) N/A Seventh Avenue and Fort Lee Ferry Line Brooklyn Bridge Fort Lee Ferry Centre Street, Canal Street, West Broadway, Sixth Avenue, 23rd Street, Seventh Avenue, Broadway, and 125th Street New York Railways Eighth Avenue Line South Ferry or Cortlandt Street Ferry Harlem Trinity Place, West Broadway, and Eighth Avenue opened by the Eighth Avenue Railroad in 1852 leased by the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1896 leased by New York Railways in 1911 lease cancelled in 1919 merged into the Eighth and Ninth Avenues Railway in 1926 replaced by Eighth Avenue Coach Corporation buses on November 12, 1935 (now the M10 bus) New York Railways Ninth and Columbus Avenues Line Cortlandt Street Ferry Morningside Heights Greenwich Street, Washington Street, Ninth Avenue, and Columbus Avenue split between the Ninth Avenue Line and Broadway and Columbus Avenue Line New York Railways Ninth and Amsterdam Avenues Line Cortlandt Street Ferry or Christopher Street Ferry, earlier City Hall Morningside Heights Greenwich Street, Washington Street, Ninth Avenue, Broadway, and Amsterdam Avenue opened by the Ninth Avenue Railroad in 1859 leased by the Houston, West Street and Pavonia Ferry Railroad in 1892 leased by the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1893 leased by New York Railways in 1911 lease cancelled in 1919 merged into the Eighth and Ninth Avenues Railway in 1926 replaced by Eighth Avenue Coach Corporation buses on November 12, 1935 (now the M11 bus) Third Avenue Railway West Belt Line South Ferry Midtown West Street and Tenth Avenue opened by the Central Park, North and East River Railroad in 1863 leased to the Houston, West Street and Pavonia Ferry Railroad and Metropolitan Crosstown Railway in 1892 leased to the Metropolitan Street Railway in 1893 lease cancelled in 1908 bought by the Third Avenue Railway as part of the reorganized Belt Line Railway in 1913 Third Avenue Railway Tenth Avenue Line West 42nd Street Ferry Manhattanville 42nd Street, Amsterdam Avenue, Broadway, and 125th Street ...
Houston, West Street And Pavonia Ferry Railroad
... The Houston, West Street and Pavonia Ferry Railroad was a street railway company in the U.S ... The Avenue C Railroad was chartered June 3, 1874 (or December 18, 1868 ), and its original line, the Avenue C Line from the Green Point Ferry at the foot of ... the Central Park, North and East River Railroad (First Avenue and East Belt Line) on Avenue A, 23rd Street, and 1st Avenue, west on 35th Street and 36th Street, north on Lexington ...
New York Railways Company - Background - Prior To Incorporation in 1911
... horse cars of the New York and Harlem Railroad, which began operations on the Bowery on November 26, 1832. 1886, with only two leases in effect at the time the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Street Railroad to the Third Avenue Railroad (1870) and the Bleecker Street and Fulton Ferry Railroad to the ... buying the Broadway and Seventh Avenue Railroad, Houston, West Street and Pavonia Ferry Railroad, and Chambers Street and Grand Street Ferry Railroad in June 1886, forming a ...
Reaction Ferry
... A reaction ferry is a cable ferry that uses the reaction of the current of a river against a fixed tether to propel the vessel across the river ... Where an overhead cable is used a "traveller" is usually installed on the cable and the ferry is attached to the traveller by a bridle cable ... To operate the ferry either the bridle cable is adjusted or a rudder is used, causing the ferry to be angled into the current, and the force of the current moves the ferry across the river ...

Famous quotes containing the words railroad and/or ferry:

    Though the railroad and the telegraph have been established on the shores of Maine, the Indian still looks out from her interior mountains over all these to the sea.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    John Brown and Giuseppe Garibaldi were contemporaries not solely in the matter of time; their endeavors as liberators link their names where other likeness is absent; and the peaks of their careers were reached almost simultaneously: the Harper’s Ferry Raid occurred in 1859, the raid on Sicily in the following year. Both events, however differing in character, were equally quixotic.
    John Cournos (1881–1956)