Palestine - Boundaries

Boundaries

The boundaries of Palestine have varied throughout history. The Jordan Rift Valley (comprising Wadi Arabah, the Dead Sea and River Jordan) has at times formed a political and administrative frontier, even within empires that have controlled both territories. At other times, such as during certain periods during the Hasmonean and Crusader states for example, as well as during the biblical period, territories on both sides of the river formed part of the same administrative unit. During the Arab Caliphate period, parts of southern Lebanon and the northern highland areas of Palestine and Jordan were administered as Jund al-Urdun, while the southern parts of the latter two formed part of Jund Dimashq, which during the ninth century was attached to the administrative unit of Jund Filasteen (Arabic: جند فلسطين‎).

The boundaries of the area and the ethnic nature of the people referred to by Herodotus in the 5th century BCE as Palaestina vary according to context. Sometimes, he uses it to refer to the coast north of Mount Carmel. Elsewhere, distinguishing the Syrians in Palestine from the Phoenicians, he refers to their land as extending down all the coast from Phoenicia to Egypt. Pliny, writing in Latin in the 1st century CE, describes a region of Syria that was "formerly called Palaestina" among the areas of the Eastern Mediterranean.

Since the Byzantine Period, the Byzantine borders of Palaestina (I and II, also known as Palaestina Prima, "First Palestine", and Palaestina Secunda, "Second Palestine"), have served as a name for the geographic area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea. Under Arab rule, Filastin (or Jund Filastin) was used administratively to refer to what was under the Byzantines Palaestina Secunda (comprising Judaea and Samaria), while Palaestina Prima (comprising the Galilee region) was renamed Urdunn ("Jordan" or Jund al-Urdunn).

Nineteenth-century sources refer to Palestine as extending from the sea to the caravan route, presumably the Hejaz-Damascus route east of the Jordan River valley. Others refer to it as extending from the sea to the desert. Prior to the Allied Powers victory in World War I and the Partitioning of the Ottoman Empire, which created the British mandate in the Levant, most of the northern area of what is today Jordan formed part of the Ottoman Vilayet of Damascus (Syria), while the southern part of Jordan was part of the Vilayet of Hejaz. What later became part of British Mandate Palestine was in Ottoman times divided between the Vilayet of Beirut (Lebanon) and the Sanjak of Jerusalem.

The Zionist Organization provided its definition concerning the boundaries of Palestine in a statement to the Paris Peace Conference in 1919. On the basis of a League of Nations mandate, the British administered Palestine after World War I, promising to establish a Jewish homeland. The original Mandate Palestine included what is now Israel, the West Bank (of the Jordan), and Transjordan (the present kingdom of Jordan), although the latter was disattached by an administrative decision of the British in 1922. To the Palestinian people who view Palestine as their homeland, its boundaries are those of Mandate Palestine excluding the Transjordan, as described in the Palestinian National Charter.

Read more about this topic:  Palestine

Other articles related to "boundaries":

Symbols and Social Mobility - Influences That Cross Multiple Boundaries
... The benefits of having symbols that define social boundaries work to keep people from falling down as much as they can prevent others from moving up ... are often seen by children as bridging the more detrimental class boundaries ... cross-cultural differences in how symbolic boundaries are linked to social boundaries ...
Richmond Park (UK Parliament Constituency) - Boundaries
... Richmond Park constituency stretches from Barnes in the north to Kingston upon Thames in the south, and includes the whole of East Sheen, Mortlake, Kew, Richmond, Petersham and Ham ... The boundaries also include the Royal Park that gives it its name ...
Ross, Skye And Lochaber (UK Parliament Constituency) - Boundaries - Local Government Area
... Ward boundaries were redrawn again in 2007, and the management areas were abolished in favour of three new corporate management areas ... The new areas consist of groups of the new wards, and boundaries are similar to those of the Westminster constituencies, as created in 2005 ...
Symbols and Social Mobility - Social Science and Understanding Segmentation
... Boundaries could be sexual, racial, or linguistic, or they could look at other definitions of boundaries ... Geographical boundaries are an example that is strongly reinforced but not as apparent without extra symbols ... teams are an excellent example of symbols that define geographic boundaries ...
Rockingham Forest - History
... The boundaries were marked by the river Nene on the eastern side, and on the western side what is now the A508 road from Market Harborough to Northampton ... The forest boundaries were set in 1299, although the boundaries returned to a smaller area as a result of King Charles I's actions ...

Famous quotes containing the word boundaries:

    Not too many years ago, a child’s experience was limited by how far he or she could ride a bicycle or by the physical boundaries that parents set. Today ... the real boundaries of a child’s life are set more by the number of available cable channels and videotapes, by the simulated reality of videogames, by the number of megabytes of memory in the home computer. Now kids can go anywhere, as long as they stay inside the electronic bubble.
    Richard Louv (20th century)

    Ideas are not thoughts; the thought respects the boundaries that the idea ignores thereby failing to realize itself.
    Franz Grillparzer (1791–1872)

    It is the story-teller’s task to elicit sympathy and a measure of understanding for those who lie outside the boundaries of State approval.
    Graham Greene (1904–1991)