Outlying Fells

Outlying Fells

The Outlying Fells of Lakeland is a book written by Alfred Wainwright, dealing with hills in and around the Lake District of England. It differs from Wainwright's Pictorial Guides in that each of its 56 chapters describes a walk, sometimes taking in several summits, rather than a single fell. This has caused some confusion on the part of authors attempting to prepare a definitive list of peaks. The Outlying Fells do not form part of the 214 hills generally accepted as comprising the Wainwrights, but they are included in Category 2B of the Hill Walkers Register maintained by the Long Distance Walkers Association.

The arrangement of chapters in the book is clockwise starting in the south east, with the first chapter devoted to Scout Scar, a walk starting at Kendal Town Hall.

The list at the back of Wainwright's book contains 110 named fells and summits. Close inspection shows seven of them to refer to other hills in the list, while Newton Fell has two summits. Thus:

  • Cartmel Fell is the same as Ravens Barrow (page 42).
  • Hollow Moor is the summit of Green Quarter Fell (page 14).
  • Hooker Crag is the summit of Muncaster fell (page 186).
  • Newton Fell includes Newton Fell (North) and Newton Fell (South) (page 53).
  • Potter Fell is the name given to the hill whose summits are Brunt Knotts and Ulgraves (page 8).
  • Lord's Seat is the summit of Whitbarrow (page 36).
  • Williamson's Monument is the same as High Knott (page 18).
  • Woodland Fell is the name of the moor of which Yew Bank and Wool Knott are high points (page 102).

The addition of the 12 nameless summits brings the number of Wainwright's Outlying Fells to 116. This is 14 more than the 102 hills listed in John M. Turner's New Combined Indexes to A. Wainwright's Pictorial Guides (second edition, Lingdales Press, 1984). Turner's list omits two tops explicitly mentioned in the book (St. John's Hill and Newton Fell South) and the 12 nameless summits, and it contains many inaccuracies. For more up-to-date heights, grid references and other data, see Database of British and Irish Hills.

Read more about Outlying FellsHighest and Lowest, List of Summits, References

Other articles related to "outlying fells, fell":

The Outlying Fells Of Lakeland
... The Outlying Fells of Lakeland is a book written by Alfred Wainwright, dealing with hills in and around the Lake District of England ... its 56 chapters describes a walk, sometimes taking in several summits, rather than a single fell ... The Outlying Fells do not form part of the 214 hills generally accepted as comprising the Wainwrights, but they are included in Category 2B of the Hill ...
Black Combe
... Black Combe is a fell in the south-west corner of the Lake District National Park, just four miles from the Irish Sea ... Sub-tops include White Combe, Stoupdale Head, Swinside Fell and Stoneside Hill ... The first two but not the last two are included in the index of The Outlying Fells of Lakeland and thus in lists of "Outlying fells", although all ...

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