Osorkon II

Usermaatre Setepenamun Osorkon II was a pharaoh of the Twenty-second Dynasty separate regime of Meshwesh Berber people Libyan kings of Ancient Egypt and the son of Takelot I and Queen Kapes. He ruled Egypt around 872 BC to 837 BC from Tanis, the capital of this Dynasty. After succeeding his father, he was faced with the competing rule of his cousin, king Harsiese A, who controlled both Thebes and the Western Oasis of Egypt. Osorkon feared the serious challenge posed by Harsiese's kingship to his authority but, when Harsiese conveniently died in 860 BC, Osorkon II ensured that this problem would not recur by appointing his own son Nimlot C as the next High Priest of Amun at Thebes. This consolidated the pharaoh's authority over Upper Egypt and meant that Osorkon II ruled over a united Egypt. Osorkon II's reign would be a time of large scale monumental building and prosperity for Egypt

According to a recent paper by Karl Jansen-Winkeln, king Harsiese A, and his son were only ordinary Priests of Amun, rather than High Priests of Amun, as was previously assumed. The inscription on the Koptos lid for, Harsiese A's son, never once gives him the title of High Priest. This demonstrates that the High Priest Harsiese who served is attested in statue CGC 42225 – which mentions this High Priest and is dated explicitly under Osorkon II – was, in fact, Harsiese B. The High Priest Harsiese B served Osorkon II in his final 3 years. This statue was dedicated by the Letter Writer to Pharaoh Hor IX, who was one of the most powerful men in his time. However, Hor IX almost certainly lived during the end of Osorkon II's reign since he features on Temple J in Karnak which was built late in this Pharaoh's reign, along with the serving High Priest Takelot F(the son of the High Priest Nimlot C and therefore, Osorkon II's grandson). Hor IX later served under both Shoshenq III, Pedubast I and Shoshenq VI. This means that the High Priest Harsiese mentioned on statue CGC 42225 must be the second Harsiese: Harsiese B.

Read more about Osorkon IIForeign Policy and Monumental Program, Reign Length, Marriages and Children, Successor, Tomb

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Takelot I - Tomb
... Cairo JE 72199) and an alabaster Jar (Cairo JE 86962) of Osorkon I, and a Ushabti figure of Queen Tashedkhons." In addition, a heart scarab found in the king's burial gave his name simply as "Take ... walls proved beyond doubt that the person buried here could only be Takelot I, Osorkon II's father ... Osorkon II arranged for this aforementioned inscription to be carved on a scene in his tomb where Osorkon is depicted adoring Osiris and Udjo (as a uraeus) ...
Takelot III - Papyrus Berlin 3048
... either Takelot II or III), records a Marriage Contract which was witnessed by Vizier Hor, and 2 Royal Treasurers Bakenamun and Djedmontuiufankh respectively ... The papyrus has traditionally been assigned to Takelot II since this ruler's Highest Date is his Year 25 whereas Takelot III's highest unequivocal date was only thought to be his Year 7 ... with the known facts for the period from the reign of Osorkon II until the early years of Osorkon III at Thebes when only a single person from one influential family served in this office ...
Hornakht
... Prince Hornakht was the son of pharaoh Osorkon II ... He was appointed by Osorkon II to the office of chief priest of Amun at Tanis to strengthen this king's authority in Lower Egypt ... However, this was primarily a political move on Osorkon II's part since Hornakht died before the age of 10 ...
Osorkon II - Tomb
... The French excavator, Pierre Montet discovered Osorkon II's plundered royal tomb at Tanis on February 27, 1939 ... It revealed that Osorkon II was buried in a massive granite sarcophagus with a lid carved from a Ramesside era statue ...
Sheshonk II - Shoshenq II's Enigmatic Identity
... There is a small possibility that Shoshenq II was the son of Shoshenq I ... Two bracelets from Shoshenq II's tomb mention king Shoshenq I while a pectoral was inscribed with the title 'Great Chief of the Ma Shoshenq,' a title which Shoshenq I employed under Psusennes II before he ... uncertainty regarding the parentage of this king exists some scholars today contend that Shoshenq II was actually a younger son of Shoshenq I--who outlived ...