Oslo Central Station

Oslo Central Station (Norwegian: Oslo sentralstasjon, abbreviated Oslo S) is the main railway station in Oslo, and the largest railway station within the entire Norwegian railway system. It is the terminus of Drammen Line, Gardermoen Line, Gjøvik Line, Hoved Line and Østfold Line. It serves express, regional and local rail services by four companies. The railway station is owned and operated by Norwegian National Rail Administration and was opened in 1980.

Oslo Central was built on the site of the older Oslo East Station (Oslo Østbanestasjon, Oslo Ø), the combining of the former east and west stations being made possible by the opening of the Oslo Tunnel. Oslo Central has nineteen tracks, thirteen of which have connections through the Oslo Tunnel. The station has two buildings, the original Oslo East building and the newer main building for Oslo Central. Each building houses a large shopping centre. The square in front of the station is called Jernbanetorget.

Read more about Oslo Central StationService

Other articles related to "oslo, stations, station, central, oslo central station":

Oslo Tunnel - History
... By the 1930s, Oslo had two main railway stations, Oslo East Station and Oslo West Station ... regional and intercity trains from the Sørland Line and the Vestfold Line, terminated at Oslo V ... The Østfold, Trunk and Gjøvik Lines terminated at Oslo Ø ...
Foreign Relations Of Turkey - Central Asia
... linguistic ties with the predominantly Turkic nations of Central Asia since Turks originated in Central Asia themselves ... of visa requirements for citizens of the Central Asian Turkic republics ... an alliance of trade between Turkey and the Central Asian states ...
Oslo Central Station - Service - Connections
... Oslo S plus Jernbanetorget is Norway's largest transport hub, served by buses, trams and subway ... Connection to all six subway lines can be done through Jernbanetorget subway station Trams and some city buses stop outside the station at Jernbanetorget Long-distan ...
Geography Of Pakistan
... which mainly comprises the Iranian plateau, some parts of the Middle East and Central Asia ... The Northern Areas and Azad Kashmir lie mainly in Central Asia along the edge of the Indian plate and hence are prone to violent earthquakes where the two tectonic plates ... have served as traditional migration routes between Central Eurasia and South Asia ...
Central Committee
... Central Committee was the common designation of a standing administrative body of communist parties, analogous to a board of directors, whether ruling or non-ruling in the ... In those states where it constituted the state power, the Central Committee made decisions for the party between congresses, and usually was responsible for electing the Politburo ... In non-ruling Communist parties, the Central Committee is usually understood by the party membership to be the ultimate decision-making authority between Congresses once the process ...

Famous quotes containing the words central station, station and/or central:

    There is no such thing as a free lunch.
    —Anonymous.

    An axiom from economics popular in the 1960s, the words have no known source, though have been dated to the 1840s, when they were used in saloons where snacks were offered to customers. Ascribed to an Italian immigrant outside Grand Central Station, New York, in Alistair Cooke’s America (epilogue, 1973)

    Say first, of God above, or Man below,
    What can we reason, but from what we know?
    Of Man what see we, but his station here,
    From which to reason, or to which refer?
    Thro’ worlds unnumber’d tho’ the God be known,
    ‘Tis ours to trace him only in our own.

    Alexander Pope (1688–1744)

    Et in Arcadia ego.
    [I too am in Arcadia.]
    Anonymous, Anonymous.

    Tomb inscription, appearing in classical paintings by Guercino and Poussin, among others. The words probably mean that even the most ideal earthly lives are mortal. Arcadia, a mountainous region in the central Peloponnese, Greece, was the rustic abode of Pan, depicted in literature and art as a land of innocence and ease, and was the title of Sir Philip Sidney’s pastoral romance (1590)