Olvera Street History

Some articles on street, streets:

23rd Street (Manhattan)
23rd Street is a broad thoroughfare in the New York City borough of Manhattan ... It is one of few two-way streets in the gridiron of the borough ... As with Manhattan's other "crosstown" streets, it is divided at Fifth Avenue, in this case at Madison Square Park, into its east and west sections ...
Inhalant Abuse - Patterns of Non-medical Usage - Africa and Asia
... Glue and gasoline sniffing is also a problem in parts of Africa, especially with street children, and South Asia ... Street children who could not obtain glue were sometimes reported to improvise with fermented human waste, which they called jenkem ... This fluid is also used by street and working children in Delhi ...
Zhima Jie - Books
... Sesame Street School Readiness (11 titles) Sesame Street Thinking Child (6 titles) Sesame Street Learning Environment (4 titles) ...
Omsk - Cityscape
... centerpiece of the city is an ensemble of buildings along Lyubinsky Avenue/Lenina Street, anchored by the former Gostiny Dvor, and flanked by two chapels ... interest is Nikolsky Avenue/Krasnykh Zor Street, where a line of merchants' wooden houses still stands ... The street leads to the Neoclassical cathedral of St ...
Uxbridge - Transport
... in 1933, is fronted by a pedestrian high street and is connected to a bus terminus with connections to Hillingdon, Hayes, Ealing, Ruislip, and Slough ... once two overground railway stations - Uxbridge Vine Street (originally just Uxbridge Station) and Uxbridge High Street ... Both were planned to be linked, hence High Street ending on a half built bridge ...

Famous quotes containing the words history and/or street:

    The history of the Victorian Age will never be written: we know too much about it.
    Lytton Strachey (1880–1932)

    For now the moon with friendless light carouses
    On hill and housetop, street and marketplace,
    Men will plunge, mile after mile of men,
    To crush this lucent madness of the face....
    Allen Tate (1899–1979)