Old Prussian Language - Examples of Prussian

Examples of Prussian

Translation Phrase
Prussian Prūsiskan
Prussia Prūsa and (historic state) Prūsija
Hello Kaīls
Good morning Kaīls Anksteīnai
Good-bye Sandēi
Thank you Dīnkun
How much? Kelli?
Yes
No Ni
Where is the bathroom? Kwēi ast spaktāstuba?
(Generic toast) Kaīls pas kaīls aīns per āntran
Do you speak English? Bilāi tū Ēngliskai?

Prussian was a highly inflected language, as can be seen from the declension of the demonstrative pronoun stas, "that". (Note that translators of the Teutonic Order frequently misused stas as an article, i.e. for the word "the"; Old Prussian, like the other Baltic languages, but unlike German, had no real articles.)

Case m.sg. f.sg. n.sg. m.pl. f.pl. n.pl.
Nominative stas stāi stan stāi stās stai
Genitive stesse stesses stesse stēisan stēisan stēisan
Dative stesmu stessei stesmu or stesmā stēimans stēimans stēimans
Accusative stan stan stan or sta stans stans stans or stas

Prussian also possessed a vocative case.

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Famous quotes containing the words examples of and/or examples:

    There are many examples of women that have excelled in learning, and even in war, but this is no reason we should bring ‘em all up to Latin and Greek or else military discipline, instead of needle-work and housewifry.
    Bernard Mandeville (1670–1733)

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    Bernard Mandeville (1670–1733)