Octagonal Schoolhouse

Octagonal Schoolhouse, Octagonal School or Octagon School, etc., may refer to any of a number of octagonal school buildings:

  • Sheldon Jackson School, Sitka, Alaska, a property listed on the NRHP
  • Octagonal Schoolhouse (Cowgill's Corner, Delaware), a property listed on the NRHP
  • Charter Oak Schoolhouse, Schuline, Illinois, a property listed on the NRHP
  • Modern Times School, Brentwood, New York, a property listed on the NRHP
  • Octagonal Schoolhouse (Essex, New York), a property listed on the NRHP
  • The "Bee Hive", a former schoolhouse built in 1859 by Quakers in Skaneateles, New York
  • Florence Corners School, Florence, Ohio, a property listed on the NRHP
  • Sodom Schoolhouse, Montandon, Pennsylvania, a property listed on the NRHP
  • Birmingham Friends Meetinghouse and Octagonal School, Chester County, Pennsylvania, a property listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP)
  • Hood Octagonal School, Newtown Township, Pennsylvania, a property listed on the NRHP
  • Octagon Stone Schoolhouse, South Canaan, Pennsylvania, a property listed on the NRHP
  • Wrightstown Octagonal Schoolhouse, Wrightstown, Pennsylvania, a property listed on the NRHP

Read more about Octagonal Schoolhouse:  See Also

Other articles related to "schoolhouse, octagonal, octagonal schoolhouse":

List Of Octagonal Buildings And Structures In The United States - Schools and Colleges
... The "Bee Hive", a former schoolhouse built by Quakers in 1859 in Skaneateles, New York Birmingham Friends Meetinghouse and Octagonal School, Birmingham ...
Octagonal Schoolhouse - See Also
... List of octagonal buildings and structures in the United States This article includes a list of related items that share the same name (or similar names) ...

Famous quotes containing the word schoolhouse:

    We saw one schoolhouse in our walk, and listened to the sounds which issued from it; but it appeared like a place where the process, not of enlightening, but of obfuscating the mind was going on, and the pupils received only so much light as could penetrate the shadow of the Catholic Church.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)