Obverse and Reverse - Specific Currencies - Coins of The United States

Coins of The United States

Some modern states specify, by law or published policy, what appears (and sometimes what will appear) on the obverse and reverse of their currency. (The specifications mentioned here imply the use of all upper-case letters, although they appear here in upper and lower case letters for the legibility of the article.)

The United States government long adhered to including all of the following:

  • Obverse:
    • "Liberty"
    • "In God We Trust"
    • The four digits of a year, that of minting and/or issue
  • Reverse:
    • "United States of America"
    • "E Pluribus Unum"
    • Words (not digits) expressing the name or assigned value of the item, e.g., "Quarter Dollar", "One Dime", "Five Cents"

The ten-year series of Statehood Quarters, whose issue began in 1999, however, was seen as calling for more space and more flexibility in the design of the reverse. A law specific to this series and the corresponding time period permits the following:

  • Obverse:
    • as before:
      • "Liberty"
      • "In God We Trust"
    • instead of on the reverse:
      • "United States of America"
      • The words expressing assigned value of the coin, "Quarter Dollar"
  • Reverse:
    • as before:
      • "E Pluribus Unum"
    • instead of on the obverse:
      • The four digits of the year of issue

In addition, all US coins bear the image of a noteworthy American statesman on the obverse (such as Abraham Lincoln on the penny and George Washington on the quarter).

Read more about this topic:  Obverse And Reverse, Specific Currencies

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