Nominative Singular

Some articles on nominative singular, nominative, singular:

Malayalam Language - Grammar - Words Adopted From Sanskrit - Nouns
... nouns with a word stem ending in a short /a/ take the ending /an/ in the nominative singular ... There are also a small number of nominative /ī/ endings that have not been shortened – a prominent example being the word "strī" for "woman" ... Nouns that have a stem in /-an/ and which end with a long /ā/ in the masculine nominative singular have /vŭ/ added to them, for example "Brahmā" (stem "Brahman") -> "Brahmāv ...
Brahman - Semantics and Pronunciation
... In Vedic Sanskrit- Brahma (ब्रह्म) (nominative singular), brahman (ब्रह्मन्) (stem) (neuter gender) means the Great Cosmic Spirit, from root brha Brahmānda ... Sanskrit usage- Brahma (ब्रह्म) (nominative singular), brahman (stem) (neuter gender) means the concept of the transcendent and immanent ultimate reality of the One ... Brahmā (ब्रह्मा) (nominative singlular), Brahman (ब्रह्मन्) (stem) (masculine gender), means the deity or deva Prajāpati Brahmā ...
Slovene Nouns - Declensions - Feminine Declension - Second
... Feminine Second Declension Number Case Singular Dual Plural Nominative (1) perut peruti peruti Genitive (2) peruti peruti peruti Dative (3) peruti perutma perutim Accusative (4 ... For example, pesem (a song) has an instrumental singular form of pesmijo, a dative/instrumental dual form of pesmima, and an instrumental plural of pesmimi ... Some nouns drop the schwa (-e-) that occurs in the nominative case (fill vowel) ...
Latin Declension - Nouns - Second Declension (o)
... In the nominative singular, most masculine nouns consist of the stem and the ending -us, although some end in -er, which is not necessarily attached to the complete stem ... Neuter nouns generally have a nominative singular consisting of the stem and the ending -um ... as a suffix to the root of the noun in the genitive singular form ...

Famous quotes containing the word singular:

    Singularity is only pardonable in old age and retirement; I may now be as singular as I please, but you may not.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694–1773)