Nissan Pulsar GTI-R - Models

Models

Main versions:
There were two distinct models of the Pulsar GTI-R sold to the general public, identifiable by the model number found on the VIN plate located on the firewall in the engine bay. There are no external visual differences.

GTI-RA (aka RA / Alpha / Road / Luxury), model number EBYNRVFN14xxxx. This was the normal road car, which came standard with air conditioning, power windows and mirrors, and abs. Roughly half way through the production (August 1992), Nissan made a range of cosmetic changes to the interior of the RA model (mostly replacing trim that was unique to the GTI-R with trim that was common to other models in the N14 range). Although not advertised or branded as such, they were extensive enough (around 10 items) to be noticeable as a different phase or series, and are defined by chassis numbers RNN14-100000 and above. They were priced at ¥2,270,000.

  • RB models:

GTI-RB (aka RB / Beta / Rally / Homologation), model number EBYNRRFN14xxxx. The homologated model was stripped-down as a base for motorsport use (Group N rallying in particular). It had the luxury trimmings such as air conditioning, power windows, and ABS removed as standard, and the simple interior trim from the base model Pulsar which reduced the curb weight by 30 kg (66 lb) to 1,190 kg (2,624 lb). Some of the luxury items were available as an option. The engine remained the same as the RA model, but there were a few mechanical changes such as a close-ratio gearbox and a front lsd instead of the open diff from the RA model.

Other versions:

  • NISMO

Nismo offered a "complete car" version based on the RB model featuring many of the Nismo rally options (such as suspension, LSDs, seats, roll cage and foot rests). A confirmed total of 21 were produced, all of which are individually numbered on a special Nismo VIN plate on the firewall. Some were used by Nissan and Nismo as promotional vehicles, the rest were ordered by private buyers. They were priced at ¥3,140,000.

  • GROUP A

The Group A Rally Cars were not sold to the general public. They were specifically built and used for the WRC by the defunct NME (Nissan Motorsports Europe) as the Works cars. After NME was disbanded, the cars were sold to private buyers, predominately in Europe, where some made their way into Rallycross events. Tony Bardy is currently still competing in UK rallies using the "J3" NME car.

Sunny:
Sunny was the badge used for the European-delivered GTI-R. They had a different chassis number of EGNN14, and came in both right hand drive and left hand drive variants. The engine output specifications (220 PS / 162 kW and 267 Nm / 197 lb·ft) were slightly less due to the ecu having different fuel and ignition maps to compensate for the lower octane fuel available in those areas. The Sunny GTI-R had several physical differences to the Pulsar, such as the rear number plate surround and rear fog lights. The interior also varied from the Pulsar with some of the more basic trim from the RB model. In 1992 they were priced in the UK at £20,553.

Production:

  • Pulsar

The Pulsars were manufactured in Japan between August 1990 until November 1994. The total number produced during that time was somewhere between 12,000 and 15,000. It is unclear how many of them were RA and RB models. The first year of production (1990–91) was the largest due to Nissan needing to fulfill the FIA Group A regulations (of 5,000 models total, with 500 of them homologated) in order to enter the model as a manufacturer in the WRC.

The RHD Sunny models were produced from 1992 until January 1995. No recorded data has been found for LHD models. No verifiable evidence has been available of Sunny GTI-R production numbers, but it is generally accepted that less than 1000 were produced in total. They were officially sold in the UK, Germany, The Netherlands, Iceland, Italy and France.

Read more about this topic:  Nissan Pulsar GTI-R

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