New York State Route 28

New York State Route 28 (NY 28) is a state highway extending for 281.69 miles (453.34 km) in the shape of a "C" between the Hudson Valley city of Kingston and southern Warren County in the U.S. state of New York. Along the way, it intersects several major routes, including Interstate 88 (I-88), U.S. Route 20 (US 20), and the New York State Thruway twice. The southern terminus of NY 28 is at NY 32 in Kingston and the northern terminus is at US 9 in Warrensburg. In Kingston, NY 28 is co-designated as Interstate 587 from its southern terminus at NY 32 to the roundabout linking it to the Thruway (I-87).

NY 28 was originally assigned in 1924 to an alignment extending from Colliersville in the south to Utica in the north via Ilion. From Colliersville to Cooperstown, the highway followed its current routing (excluding minor realignments); north of Cooperstown, NY 28 was routed along several state highways that now have other designations. The route was extended south to Kingston and north to Warrensburg as part of the 1930 renumbering of state highways in New York. At the same time, Route 28 was realigned between Cooperstown and Mohawk to follow its modern routing. Other than minor realignments in Kingston, Oneonta, and Oneida County, NY 28 has remained the same to this day.

Read more about New York State Route 28:  Suffixed Routes, Major Intersections

Other articles related to "new york state route 28, 28":

New York State Route 28 - Major Intersections
... Notes Ulster City of Kingston 0.00 0.00 I-587 / NY 32 Eastern terminus of I-587 / NY 28 overlap eastern terminus of I-587 1.21– 1.45 1.95– 2.33 I-87 ...

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