National Parks of New Zealand - National Parks Act

National Parks Act

The National Parks Act of 1980 was established in order to codify the purpose, governance and selection of national parks. It begins by establishing the definition of a national park:

It is hereby declared that the provisions of this Act shall have effect for the purpose of preserving in perpetuity as national parks, for their intrinsic worth and for the benefit, use, and enjoyment of the public, areas of New Zealand that contain scenery of such distinctive quality, ecological systems, or natural features so beautiful, unique, or scientifically important that their preservation is in the national interest.

National Parks Act 1980, Part 1, section 4, subsection 1

The National Parks Act goes on to state that the public will have freedom of entry and access to the parks, though this is subject to restrictions to ensure the preservation of native plants and animals and the welfare of the parks in general. Access to specially protected areas (550 km²) constituted under the act is by permit only. Under the Act, national parks are to be maintained in their natural state as far as possible to retain their value as soil, water and forest conservation areas. Native plants and animals are to be preserved and introduced plants and animals removed if their presence interferes with the natural wildlife. Development in wilderness areas established under the act is restricted to foot tracks and huts used for wild animal control or scientific research.

Read more about this topic:  National Parks Of New Zealand

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National Parks Of New Zealand - National Parks Act - Services Available For Public Use
... The Act allows the Department of Conservation to provide hostels, huts, camping grounds, ski tows and similar facilities, parking areas, roading and tracks within ... some accommodation, transport and other services at entry points to the parks, but these are also offered by other government agencies, voluntary organisations and private firms ... More comprehensive services within the parks, such as guided walks and skiing tutorials, are privately provided with concessions from the department ...
National Parks Act

National Parks Act may refer to, among others, these acts:

  • National Parks Act (Canada)
  • National Parks Act 1980 (Malaysia)
  • National Parks Act 1980 (New Zealand)
  • National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 (United Kingdom)

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