National Labor Relations Board V. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation

National Labor Relations Board V. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation

National Labor Relations Board v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation, 301 U.S. 1 (1937), was a United States Supreme Court case that declared that the National Labor Relations Act of 1935 (commonly known as the Wagner Act) was constitutional. It effectively spelled the end to the Court's striking down of New Deal economic legislation, and greatly increased Congress's power under the Commerce Clause.

Read more about National Labor Relations Board V. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation:  Facts, Opinion of The Court, Dissent

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